I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

Happy Birthday, Alexandre Dumas, born 24 July 1802, died 5 December 1870
12 Quotes
Learning does not make one learned: there are those who have knowledge and those who have understanding. The first requires memory and the second philosophy.
One’s work may be finished someday, but one’s education never.
Infatuated, half through conceit, half through love of my art, I achieve the impossible working as no one else ever works.
There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.
There are two distinct sorts of ideas: Those that proceed from the head and those that emanate from the heart.
In business, sir, one has no friends, only correspondents.
Life is a storm, my young friend. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes.
As a general rule…people ask for advice only in order not to follow it; or if they do follow it, in order to have someone to blame for giving it.
The difference between treason and patriotism is only a matter of dates.
There are two ways of seeing: with the body and with the soul. The body’s sight can sometimes forget, but the soul remembers forever.
True love always makes a man better, no matter what woman inspires it.
Your life story is a novel; and people, though they love novels bound between two yellow paper covers, are oddly suspicious of those which come to them in living vellum, even when they are gilded.
Dumas was a French writer. He is most famous for historical adventure novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Alexandre Dumas, born 24 July 1802, died 5 December 1870

12 Quotes

  1. Learning does not make one learned: there are those who have knowledge and those who have understanding. The first requires memory and the second philosophy.
  2. One’s work may be finished someday, but one’s education never.
  3. Infatuated, half through conceit, half through love of my art, I achieve the impossible working as no one else ever works.
  4. There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.
  5. There are two distinct sorts of ideas: Those that proceed from the head and those that emanate from the heart.
  6. In business, sir, one has no friends, only correspondents.
  7. Life is a storm, my young friend. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes.
  8. As a general rule…people ask for advice only in order not to follow it; or if they do follow it, in order to have someone to blame for giving it.
  9. The difference between treason and patriotism is only a matter of dates.
  10. There are two ways of seeing: with the body and with the soul. The body’s sight can sometimes forget, but the soul remembers forever.
  11. True love always makes a man better, no matter what woman inspires it.
  12. Your life story is a novel; and people, though they love novels bound between two yellow paper covers, are oddly suspicious of those which come to them in living vellum, even when they are gilded.

Dumas was a French writer. He is most famous for historical adventure novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 2 hours ago with 66 notes
#Alexandre Dumas  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #writers write 
Writing a Memoir: The Ultimate Selfie →

Apparently, it’s simple. You flip the camera on your phone, extend your arm and snap away. It’s not so easy for me. It takes practice, a long arm and a certain degree of confidence.

Whether you love them or hate them, avoid them or post them, selfies are here to stay. ‘Selfie’ was even selected as word of the year for 2013 by Oxford Dictionaries

Selfie Culture

Selfies are also getting a lot of flak. People who post a lot of selfies have been accused of alienating people. They are said to be shallow and have low self-esteem because they need constant approval and are prone to superficial relationships. The selfie-obsessed seem to be down-right narcissistic. Some people go so far as to call them mentally ill. (Daily Mail)

On a more positive note, they are considered empowering. They give you an opportunity to express yourself and to show pride in your appearance. They can boost your confidence, but then you should guard against becoming dependent on the opinions of others. It also allows you to control your image. (TeenVougue)

Why selfies are like writing memoirs

— 21 hours ago with 28 notes
#Writing  #Mia Botha  #Writers Write  #Memoirs 
Quotable - Raymond Chandler, born 23 July 1888, died 26 March 1959
10 Quotes on Writing

Quotable - Raymond Chandler, born 23 July 1888, died 26 March 1959

10 Quotes on Writing

— 1 day ago with 104 notes
#Raymond Chandler  #Literary Birthday  #Quotes  #Lit 
Happy Birthday, Vikram Chandra, born 23 July 1961 
Seven Quotes
The world is a story we tell ourselves about the world.
I think it’s very true when you’re a writer and you sometimes you have to spend time poking at part of yourself that normal, sane people leave alone.
The novel is a technology that is fairly new, of recent invention. Yes, in the age of television and the Net, the novel will never again attain that central position of cultural authority and importance that it had in the eighteenth or nineteenth century, when it taught us to narrate our lives according to certain principles, to interpret the world in a particular way. But this doesn’t mean it’s dead. It’s still very much alive, and will continue to remain so.
It was 1987 when all the minimalist stuff was in vogue, and suddenly here I am with all these Indian gods making pronouncements. They’d say, ‘This is melodrama,’ and I would answer, ‘I know, but I like melodrama; we Indians do melodrama.
Read, read, read, and then explore your obsessions because I think that’s where the energy comes from. There’s nothing worse than starting something and then getting bored with it when you’re halfway through.
I like teaching. It takes me out of myself. I have a tendency to just camp out in some little hole with a computer and books and not emerge for a week, and that’s actually bad for me.
At some point in the semester I’ll get the question, ‘Why does every story have to have a conflict? Can’t we just write something different?’ And my answer is, ‘Yes you can, but will it work? Will anybody want to read it?’
Chandra is an Indian-American writer. His first novel, Red Earth and Pouring Rain, won the 1996 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Vikram Chandra, born 23 July 1961 

Seven Quotes

  1. The world is a story we tell ourselves about the world.
  2. I think it’s very true when you’re a writer and you sometimes you have to spend time poking at part of yourself that normal, sane people leave alone.
  3. The novel is a technology that is fairly new, of recent invention. Yes, in the age of television and the Net, the novel will never again attain that central position of cultural authority and importance that it had in the eighteenth or nineteenth century, when it taught us to narrate our lives according to certain principles, to interpret the world in a particular way. But this doesn’t mean it’s dead. It’s still very much alive, and will continue to remain so.
  4. It was 1987 when all the minimalist stuff was in vogue, and suddenly here I am with all these Indian gods making pronouncements. They’d say, ‘This is melodrama,’ and I would answer, ‘I know, but I like melodrama; we Indians do melodrama.
  5. Read, read, read, and then explore your obsessions because I think that’s where the energy comes from. There’s nothing worse than starting something and then getting bored with it when you’re halfway through.
  6. I like teaching. It takes me out of myself. I have a tendency to just camp out in some little hole with a computer and books and not emerge for a week, and that’s actually bad for me.
  7. At some point in the semester I’ll get the question, ‘Why does every story have to have a conflict? Can’t we just write something different?’ And my answer is, ‘Yes you can, but will it work? Will anybody want to read it?’

Chandra is an Indian-American writer. His first novel, Red Earth and Pouring Rain, won the 1996 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 day ago with 37 notes
#vikram chandra  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson