I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

Happy Birthday, Jill Lepore, born 27 August 1966
Five Quotes
The study of history requires investigation, imagination, empathy, and respect. Reverence just doesn’t enter into it.
History is hereditary only in this way: we, all of us, inherit everything, and then we choose what to cherish, what to disavow, and what do do next, which is why it’s worth trying to know where things come from.
Writing history requires empathy, inquiry, and debate. It requires forswearing condescension, cant, and nostalgia. The past isn’t quaint. Much of it, in fact, is bleak.
Innovation and disruption are ideas that originated in the arena of business but which have since been applied to arenas whose values and goals are remote from the values and goals of business. People aren’t disk drives. Public schools, colleges and universities, churches, museums, and many hospitals, all of which have been subjected to disruptive innovation, have revenues and expenses and infrastructures, but they aren’t industries in the same way that manufacturers of hard-disk drives or truck engines or drygoods are industries. 
…but everyone tries; trying is the human condition. All anyone can do is ask.
Lepore is an American professor and writer. She is chair of Harvard’s History and Literature Program. She writes for The New Yorker, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and The American Scholar, among others. Her biography, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin, was a finalist for the 2013 National Book Award for Nonfiction.
Source for Image: Dari Michele.
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Jill Lepore, born 27 August 1966

Five Quotes

  1. The study of history requires investigation, imagination, empathy, and respect. Reverence just doesn’t enter into it.
  2. History is hereditary only in this way: we, all of us, inherit everything, and then we choose what to cherish, what to disavow, and what do do next, which is why it’s worth trying to know where things come from.
  3. Writing history requires empathy, inquiry, and debate. It requires forswearing condescension, cant, and nostalgia. The past isn’t quaint. Much of it, in fact, is bleak.
  4. Innovation and disruption are ideas that originated in the arena of business but which have since been applied to arenas whose values and goals are remote from the values and goals of business. People aren’t disk drives. Public schools, colleges and universities, churches, museums, and many hospitals, all of which have been subjected to disruptive innovation, have revenues and expenses and infrastructures, but they aren’t industries in the same way that manufacturers of hard-disk drives or truck engines or drygoods are industries. 
  5. …but everyone tries; trying is the human condition. All anyone can do is ask.

Lepore is an American professor and writer. She is chair of Harvard’s History and Literature Program. She writes for The New Yorker, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and The American Scholar, among others. Her biography, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin, was a finalist for the 2013 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

Source for Image: Dari Michele.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 3 hours ago with 17 notes
#Amanda Patterson  #Jill Lepore  #Literary Birthday 
"It is also true that one can write nothing readable unless one constantly struggles to efface one’s own personality. Good prose is like a windowpane."
George Orwell
— 19 hours ago with 75 notes
#George Orwell 
Why you need strong verbs when you write →
Strong verbs improve your writing in three ways. They help you:
  1. Reduce adverbs: Choosing strong verbs helps you to be specific. You should replace an adverb and a verb with a strong verb if you can. It will improve your writing. Don’t say: “She held on tightly to the rope.” Do say: “She gripped the rope.” Don’t say: “He looked carefully at the documents.” Do say: “He examined the documents.”

  2. Avoid the passive voice: Choose specific, active verbs whenever you can. Don’t say: ‘He was said to be lying by the teacher.’ Do say: ‘The teacher accused him of lying.’

  3. Eliminate wordiness: Strong verbs help you eliminate wordiness by replacing different forms of the verb ‘to be’. They allow you to stop overusing words like ‘is’, ‘was’, ‘are’, and ‘were’. Don’t say: ‘She was the owner of a chain of restaurants.’ Do say: ‘She owned a chain of restaurants.’

If you reduce wordiness, choose specific verbs, and use the active voice, readers will be able to understand you more easily. This is what you want because the reason we write is to communicate. 
Examples of Strong Verbs
— 21 hours ago with 267 notes
#Why you need to use strong verbs when you write  #Writing Advice  #Writing Tips  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson  #Writing Courses in South Africa  #grammar