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I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

Happy Birthday, Thom Gunn, born 29 August 1929, died 25 April 2004
Five Quotes
As humans we look at things and think about what we’ve looked at. We treasure it in a kind of private art gallery.
A literary influence is never just a literary influence. It’s also an influence in the way you see everything - in the way you feel your life.
I admired what my students were writing, but I think their improvement doesn’t directly result from me but from being in a class, being with each other.
We control the content of our dreams.
Deep feeling doesn’t make for good poetry. A way with language would be a bit of help.
Gunn was an Anglo-American poet who is well-known for The Man With Night Sweats. He won numerous literary awards including the Levinson Prize, a Rockefeller Award, and the W. H. Smith Award. He was awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim and MacArthur foundations.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Thom Gunn, born 29 August 1929, died 25 April 2004

Five Quotes

  1. As humans we look at things and think about what we’ve looked at. We treasure it in a kind of private art gallery.
  2. A literary influence is never just a literary influence. It’s also an influence in the way you see everything - in the way you feel your life.
  3. I admired what my students were writing, but I think their improvement doesn’t directly result from me but from being in a class, being with each other.
  4. We control the content of our dreams.
  5. Deep feeling doesn’t make for good poetry. A way with language would be a bit of help.

Gunn was an Anglo-American poet who is well-known for The Man With Night Sweats. He won numerous literary awards including the Levinson Prize, a Rockefeller Award, and the W. H. Smith Award. He was awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim and MacArthur foundations.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 hour ago with 20 notes
#Thom Gunn  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson 
Literary Birthday - 28 August
Happy Birthday, Janet Frame, born 28 August 1924, died 29 January 2004
Seven Quotes
I like to see life with its teeth out.
Writing a novel is not merely going on a shopping expedition across the border to an unreal land: it is hours and years spent in the factories, the streets, the cathedrals of the imagination.
All writers are exiles wherever they live and their work is a lifelong journey towards the lost land.
Everything is always a story, but the loveliest ones are those that get written and are not torn up and are taken to a friend as payment for listening, for putting a wise keyhole to the ear of my mind.
There is no past, present or future. Using tenses to divide time is like making chalk marks on water.
A writer must stand on the rock of her self and her judgment or be swept away by the tide or sink in the quaking earth: there must be an inviolate place where the choices and decisions, however imperfect, are the writer’s own, where the decision must be as individual and solitary as birth or death.
I really love emailing, it’s like writing a poem in the sky.
Frame was a New Zealand author. She wrote 11 novels, four collections of short stories, a book of poetry, and three autobiographical volumes. Frame’s traumatic experiences as a young woman feature in Jane Campion’s popular film adaptation of An Angel at My Table. 
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 28 August

Happy Birthday, Janet Frame, born 28 August 1924, died 29 January 2004

Seven Quotes

  1. I like to see life with its teeth out.
  2. Writing a novel is not merely going on a shopping expedition across the border to an unreal land: it is hours and years spent in the factories, the streets, the cathedrals of the imagination.
  3. All writers are exiles wherever they live and their work is a lifelong journey towards the lost land.
  4. Everything is always a story, but the loveliest ones are those that get written and are not torn up and are taken to a friend as payment for listening, for putting a wise keyhole to the ear of my mind.
  5. There is no past, present or future. Using tenses to divide time is like making chalk marks on water.
  6. A writer must stand on the rock of her self and her judgment or be swept away by the tide or sink in the quaking earth: there must be an inviolate place where the choices and decisions, however imperfect, are the writer’s own, where the decision must be as individual and solitary as birth or death.
  7. I really love emailing, it’s like writing a poem in the sky.

Frame was a New Zealand author. She wrote 11 novels, four collections of short stories, a book of poetry, and three autobiographical volumes. Frame’s traumatic experiences as a young woman feature in Jane Campion’s popular film adaptation of An Angel at My Table

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 22 hours ago with 51 notes
#Janet Frame  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write  #Lit 
Literary Birthday - 28 August
Happy Birthday, Tasha Tudor, born 28 August 1915, died 18 June 2008
Three Quotes
Why do women want to dress like men when they’re fortunate enough to be women? Why lose femininity, which is one of our greatest charms? We get more accomplished by being charming than we would be flaunting around in pants and smoking. I’m very fond of men. I think they are wonderful creatures. I love them dearly. But I don’t want to look like one. 
Whenever I get one of those questionnaires and they ask what is your profession, I always put down housewife. It’s an admirable profession, why apologize for it. You aren’t stupid because you’re a housewife. When you’re stirring the jam you can read Shakespeare.
Life isn’t long enough to do all you could accomplish. And what a privilege even to be alive. In spite of all the pollutions and horrors, how beautiful this world is. Supposing you only saw the stars once every year. Think what you would think. The wonder of it!
Tudor is one of America’s best-known and beloved illustrators and authors. Her first little story, Pumpkin Moonshine, was published in 1938. She illustrated nearly 100 books, the last being the 2003 release, The Corgiville Christmas. She believed she had lived before, in the 1830s and lived on a Vermont farm wearing period dresses, spinning wool, raising goats, and cultivating a garden. 
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 28 August

Happy Birthday, Tasha Tudor, born 28 August 1915, died 18 June 2008

Three Quotes

  1. Why do women want to dress like men when they’re fortunate enough to be women? Why lose femininity, which is one of our greatest charms? We get more accomplished by being charming than we would be flaunting around in pants and smoking. I’m very fond of men. I think they are wonderful creatures. I love them dearly. But I don’t want to look like one. 
  2. Whenever I get one of those questionnaires and they ask what is your profession, I always put down housewife. It’s an admirable profession, why apologize for it. You aren’t stupid because you’re a housewife. When you’re stirring the jam you can read Shakespeare.
  3. Life isn’t long enough to do all you could accomplish. And what a privilege even to be alive. In spite of all the pollutions and horrors, how beautiful this world is. Supposing you only saw the stars once every year. Think what you would think. The wonder of it!

Tudor is one of America’s best-known and beloved illustrators and authors. Her first little story, Pumpkin Moonshine, was published in 1938. She illustrated nearly 100 books, the last being the 2003 release, The Corgiville ChristmasShe believed she had lived before, in the 1830s and lived on a Vermont farm wearing period dresses, spinning wool, raising goats, and cultivating a garden. 

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 23 hours ago with 62 notes
#Tasha Tudor  #lit  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
Happy Birthday, Jill Lepore, born 27 August 1966
Five Quotes
The study of history requires investigation, imagination, empathy, and respect. Reverence just doesn’t enter into it.
History is hereditary only in this way: we, all of us, inherit everything, and then we choose what to cherish, what to disavow, and what do do next, which is why it’s worth trying to know where things come from.
Writing history requires empathy, inquiry, and debate. It requires forswearing condescension, cant, and nostalgia. The past isn’t quaint. Much of it, in fact, is bleak.
Innovation and disruption are ideas that originated in the arena of business but which have since been applied to arenas whose values and goals are remote from the values and goals of business. People aren’t disk drives. Public schools, colleges and universities, churches, museums, and many hospitals, all of which have been subjected to disruptive innovation, have revenues and expenses and infrastructures, but they aren’t industries in the same way that manufacturers of hard-disk drives or truck engines or drygoods are industries. 
…but everyone tries; trying is the human condition. All anyone can do is ask.
Lepore is an American professor and writer. She is chair of Harvard’s History and Literature Program. She writes for The New Yorker, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and The American Scholar, among others. Her biography, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin, was a finalist for the 2013 National Book Award for Nonfiction.
Source for Image: Dari Michele.
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Jill Lepore, born 27 August 1966

Five Quotes

  1. The study of history requires investigation, imagination, empathy, and respect. Reverence just doesn’t enter into it.
  2. History is hereditary only in this way: we, all of us, inherit everything, and then we choose what to cherish, what to disavow, and what do do next, which is why it’s worth trying to know where things come from.
  3. Writing history requires empathy, inquiry, and debate. It requires forswearing condescension, cant, and nostalgia. The past isn’t quaint. Much of it, in fact, is bleak.
  4. Innovation and disruption are ideas that originated in the arena of business but which have since been applied to arenas whose values and goals are remote from the values and goals of business. People aren’t disk drives. Public schools, colleges and universities, churches, museums, and many hospitals, all of which have been subjected to disruptive innovation, have revenues and expenses and infrastructures, but they aren’t industries in the same way that manufacturers of hard-disk drives or truck engines or drygoods are industries. 
  5. …but everyone tries; trying is the human condition. All anyone can do is ask.

Lepore is an American professor and writer. She is chair of Harvard’s History and Literature Program. She writes for The New Yorker, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and The American Scholar, among others. Her biography, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin, was a finalist for the 2013 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

Source for Image: Dari Michele.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 2 days ago with 27 notes
#Amanda Patterson  #Jill Lepore  #Literary Birthday 
Why you need strong verbs when you write →
Strong verbs improve your writing in three ways. They help you:
  1. Reduce adverbs: Choosing strong verbs helps you to be specific. You should replace an adverb and a verb with a strong verb if you can. It will improve your writing. Don’t say: “She held on tightly to the rope.” Do say: “She gripped the rope.” Don’t say: “He looked carefully at the documents.” Do say: “He examined the documents.”

  2. Avoid the passive voice: Choose specific, active verbs whenever you can. Don’t say: ‘He was said to be lying by the teacher.’ Do say: ‘The teacher accused him of lying.’

  3. Eliminate wordiness: Strong verbs help you eliminate wordiness by replacing different forms of the verb ‘to be’. They allow you to stop overusing words like ‘is’, ‘was’, ‘are’, and ‘were’. Don’t say: ‘She was the owner of a chain of restaurants.’ Do say: ‘She owned a chain of restaurants.’

If you reduce wordiness, choose specific verbs, and use the active voice, readers will be able to understand you more easily. This is what you want because the reason we write is to communicate. 
Examples of Strong Verbs
— 2 days ago with 304 notes
#Why you need to use strong verbs when you write  #Writing Advice  #Writing Tips  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson  #Writing Courses in South Africa  #grammar 
Happy Birthday, John Buchan, born 26 August 1875, died 11 February 1940
10 Quotes
This preoccupation with the classics was the happiest thing that could have befallen me. It gave me a standard of values. To live for a time close to great minds is the best kind of education. … Faulty though my own practice has always been, I learned sound doctrine - the virtue of a clean, bare style, of simplicity, of a hard substance and an austere pattern.
An atheist is a man who has no invisible means of support.
I believe everything out of the common. The only thing to distrust is the normal.
The book trade is spiritual barometer of a nation’s well-being.
The task of leadership is not to put greatness into humanity, but to elicit it, for the greatness is already there.
Every man at the bottom of his heart believes that he is a born detective.
The best prayers have often more groans than words.
But the big courage is the cold-blooded kind, the kind that never lets go even when you’re feeling empty inside, and your blood’s thin, and there’s no kind of fun or profit to be had, and the trouble’s not over in an hour or two but lasts for months and years.
He disliked emotion, not because he felt lightly, but because he felt deeply.
Wood, sea and hill were the intimacies of my childhood, and they have never lost their spell for me.
Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir, was a Scottish novelist, historian and politician. He is best known for writing The Thirty-Nine Steps and other adventure fiction. 
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, John Buchan, born 26 August 1875, died 11 February 1940

10 Quotes

  1. This preoccupation with the classics was the happiest thing that could have befallen me. It gave me a standard of values. To live for a time close to great minds is the best kind of education. … Faulty though my own practice has always been, I learned sound doctrine - the virtue of a clean, bare style, of simplicity, of a hard substance and an austere pattern.
  2. An atheist is a man who has no invisible means of support.
  3. I believe everything out of the common. The only thing to distrust is the normal.
  4. The book trade is spiritual barometer of a nation’s well-being.
  5. The task of leadership is not to put greatness into humanity, but to elicit it, for the greatness is already there.
  6. Every man at the bottom of his heart believes that he is a born detective.
  7. The best prayers have often more groans than words.
  8. But the big courage is the cold-blooded kind, the kind that never lets go even when you’re feeling empty inside, and your blood’s thin, and there’s no kind of fun or profit to be had, and the trouble’s not over in an hour or two but lasts for months and years.
  9. He disliked emotion, not because he felt lightly, but because he felt deeply.
  10. Wood, sea and hill were the intimacies of my childhood, and they have never lost their spell for me.

Buchan1st Baron Tweedsmuir, was a Scottish novelist, historian and politician. He is best known for writing The Thirty-Nine Steps and other adventure fiction. 

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 3 days ago with 34 notes
#John Buchan  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson 
Happy Birthday, Howard Jacobson, born 25 August 1942
10 Quotes
You begin by reading reading reading. Read good writing. Don’t write about your life, but start with what you know about. That doesn’t mean it’s you; you might know something else. 
Novels began as a comic form and should remain as a comic form.
One of the reasons there seem to be fewer readers for literature today than there were yesterday is that the concept of failure has been outlawed. If we are all beautiful, all clever, all happy, all successes in our way, what do we want with the language of the dispossessed? 
The politics of youth are, by definition, the politics of ignorance.
There was no child. Children spoilt the story.
How do you explain to somebody who doesn’t understand that you don’t build a library to read. A library is a resource. Something you go to, for reference, as and when. But also something you simply look at, because it gives you succour, answers to some idea of who you are or, more to the point, who you would like to be, who you will be once you own every book you need to own.
Novelists are drawn to failure. Those who prosper in the world as it is have no need to re-imagine it.
Read other writers but don’t be other writers. Don’t be cowed by all the great writers that you like. 
Remember that it’s your job as a writer, if you see any sign of ideology in you, to kill it. Writing is not the expression of your belief system. What you believe is of no interest to anybody. Almost what anybody believes is of no interest to anybody. 
Remember how superior art is to belief. And away you go! 
Jacobson is a British author and journalist. He won the Man Booker Prize for The Finkler Question. He is best known for writing comic novels with British Jewish characters at their centre.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Howard Jacobson, born 25 August 1942

10 Quotes

  1. You begin by reading reading reading. Read good writing. Don’t write about your life, but start with what you know about. That doesn’t mean it’s you; you might know something else. 
  2. Novels began as a comic form and should remain as a comic form.
  3. One of the reasons there seem to be fewer readers for literature today than there were yesterday is that the concept of failure has been outlawed. If we are all beautiful, all clever, all happy, all successes in our way, what do we want with the language of the dispossessed? 
  4. The politics of youth are, by definition, the politics of ignorance.
  5. There was no child. Children spoilt the story.
  6. How do you explain to somebody who doesn’t understand that you don’t build a library to read. A library is a resource. Something you go to, for reference, as and when. But also something you simply look at, because it gives you succour, answers to some idea of who you are or, more to the point, who you would like to be, who you will be once you own every book you need to own.
  7. Novelists are drawn to failure. Those who prosper in the world as it is have no need to re-imagine it.
  8. Read other writers but don’t be other writers. Don’t be cowed by all the great writers that you like. 
  9. Remember that it’s your job as a writer, if you see any sign of ideology in you, to kill it. Writing is not the expression of your belief system. What you believe is of no interest to anybody. Almost what anybody believes is of no interest to anybody.
  10. Remember how superior art is to belief. And away you go! 

Jacobson is a British author and journalist. He won the Man Booker Prize for The Finkler Question. He is best known for writing comic novels with British Jewish characters at their centre.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 3 days ago with 44 notes
#howard jacobson  #Literary Birthday  #amanda patterson 
The Magician - Meet Raymond E. Feist →

Join Writers Write and Amanda Patterson when we host Raymond E. Feist, the best-selling American fantasy author. 

Raymond Feist has sold more than 15 million books. He became famous with the Riftwar Saga, which began with Magician. He will be in South Africa to promote Magician’s End, the latest book in the series.

When? 23 September 2014
Where? Winehouse Restaurant, Ten Bompas Boutique Hotel, 10 Bompas Road,Dunkeld, Johannesburg (GPS)
What Time? 18:00 for 18:30 - 21:30
How Much? R350 per person (This includes a three-course meal, an interview with the author, and a book signing. Drinks are for your own account.)
To Book? send an email to news@writerswrite.co.za 

Join the event, Meet Raymond E. Feist, on Facebook.
— 4 days ago with 7 notes
#Meet Raymond E. Feist  #raymond e. feist  #literary event  #johannesburg  #writers write  #Amanda Patterson 
Happy Birthday, Paulo Coelho, born 24 August 1947
Top 10 Paulo Coelho Quotes
The secret of life, though, is to fall seven times and to get up eight times.
Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own.
The simple things are also the most extraordinary things, and only the wise can see them.
When we least expect it, life sets us a challenge to test our courage and willingness to change; at such a moment, there is no point in pretending that nothing has happened or in saying that we are not yet ready. The challenge will not wait. Life does not look back. A week is more than enough time for us to decide whether or not to accept our destiny.
Tears are words that need to be written.
Anyone who has lost something they thought was theirs forever finally comes to realise that nothing really belongs to them.
When I had nothing to lose, I had everything. When I stopped being who I am, I found myself.
Life is too short, or too long, for me to allow myself the luxury of living it so badly.
People never learn anything by being told, they have to find out for themselves.
Certain things in life simply have to be experienced -and never explained. Love is such a thing.
Paulo Coelho is a Brazilian lyricist and novelist.
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Paulo Coelho, born 24 August 1947

Top 10 Paulo Coelho Quotes

  1. The secret of life, though, is to fall seven times and to get up eight times.
  2. Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own.
  3. The simple things are also the most extraordinary things, and only the wise can see them.
  4. When we least expect it, life sets us a challenge to test our courage and willingness to change; at such a moment, there is no point in pretending that nothing has happened or in saying that we are not yet ready. The challenge will not wait. Life does not look back. A week is more than enough time for us to decide whether or not to accept our destiny.
  5. Tears are words that need to be written.
  6. Anyone who has lost something they thought was theirs forever finally comes to realise that nothing really belongs to them.
  7. When I had nothing to lose, I had everything. When I stopped being who I am, I found myself.
  8. Life is too short, or too long, for me to allow myself the luxury of living it so badly.
  9. People never learn anything by being told, they have to find out for themselves.
  10. Certain things in life simply have to be experienced -and never explained. Love is such a thing.

Paulo Coelho is a Brazilian lyricist and novelist.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 4 days ago with 135 notes
#Paulo Coelho  #Amanda Patterson  #Literary Birthday 
Happy Birthday, Ali Smith, born 24 August 1962
10 Quotes
Great books are adaptable. They alter with us as we alter in life, they renew themselves as we change and re-read them at different times in our lives.
Books mean all possibilities. They mean moving out of yourself, losing yourself, dying of thirst and living to your full. They mean everything.
Short stories consume you faster. They’re connected to brevity. With the short story, you are up against mortality. I know how tough they are as a form, but they’re also a total joy.
A good argument, like a good dialogue, is always a proof of life, but I’d much rather go and read a book.
Words are like untying a corset - you can move into this great space with them.
All we need to do, reader or writer, from first line to final page, is be as open as a book, and be alive to the life in language - on all its levels.
Nothing is harmful to literature except censorship.
To be known so well by someone is an unimaginable gift. But to be imagined so well by someone is even better.
There is a kind of poetry, bad and good, in everything, everywhere we look.
And they all lived happily ever after, until they died.
Smith is a Scottish writer. She is best known for her three major collections of short stories Free Love and Other Stories, Other Stories and Other Stories and The First Person
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Ali Smith, born 24 August 1962

10 Quotes

  1. Great books are adaptable. They alter with us as we alter in life, they renew themselves as we change and re-read them at different times in our lives.
  2. Books mean all possibilities. They mean moving out of yourself, losing yourself, dying of thirst and living to your full. They mean everything.
  3. Short stories consume you faster. They’re connected to brevity. With the short story, you are up against mortality. I know how tough they are as a form, but they’re also a total joy.
  4. A good argument, like a good dialogue, is always a proof of life, but I’d much rather go and read a book.
  5. Words are like untying a corset - you can move into this great space with them.
  6. All we need to do, reader or writer, from first line to final page, is be as open as a book, and be alive to the life in language - on all its levels.
  7. Nothing is harmful to literature except censorship.
  8. To be known so well by someone is an unimaginable gift. But to be imagined so well by someone is even better.
  9. There is a kind of poetry, bad and good, in everything, everywhere we look.
  10. And they all lived happily ever after, until they died.

Smith is a Scottish writer. She is best known for her three major collections of short stories Free Love and Other Stories, Other Stories and Other Stories and The First Person

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 4 days ago with 33 notes
#Ali Smith  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson 
Happy Birthday, Edgar Lee Masters, born 23 August 1868, died 5 March 1950
Six Quotes
To put meaning in one’s life may end in madness, But life without meaning is the torture Of restlessness and vague desire-It is a boat longing for the sea and yet afraid.
To this generation I would say: Memorize some bit of verse of truth or beauty.
It takes life to love life.
How shall the soul of a man be larger than the life he has lived?
In time you shall see Fate approach you in the shape of your own image in the mirror.
I ended up with a broken fiddle — And a broken laugh, and a thousand memories, And not a single regret.
Masters was an American poet, biographer, and dramatist. He is the author of Spoon River Anthology.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Edgar Lee Masters, born 23 August 1868, died 5 March 1950

Six Quotes

  1. To put meaning in one’s life may end in madness, But life without meaning is the torture Of restlessness and vague desire-It is a boat longing for the sea and yet afraid.
  2. To this generation I would say: Memorize some bit of verse of truth or beauty.
  3. It takes life to love life.
  4. How shall the soul of a man be larger than the life he has lived?
  5. In time you shall see Fate approach you in the shape of your own image in the mirror.
  6. I ended up with a broken fiddle — And a broken laugh, and a thousand memories, And not a single regret.

Masters was an American poet, biographer, and dramatist. He is the author of Spoon River Anthology.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 6 days ago with 37 notes
#Edgar Lee Masters  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
What does it take to write a book? →

I am often asked what it takes to write a book. Can anyone write a book? What special qualifications do you need to write?

It’s a good thing to have talent. It’s great if you have an English degree. However, after teaching people how to write for more than 10 years, meeting and interviewing many authors, and writing weekly posts on writing, I think the people who succeed in finishing a book have a number of things in common.

The five qualities published authors share

— 6 days ago with 117 notes
#The five qualities published authors share  #What does it take to write a book?  #Amanda Patterson  #Writing Advice  #Writers Write 
Today is the anniversary of Ray Bradbury’s birthday (born 22 August 1920, died 5 June 2012)
10 Ray Bradbury Quotes

Today is the anniversary of Ray Bradbury’s birthday (born 22 August 1920, died 5 June 2012)

10 Ray Bradbury Quotes

— 6 days ago with 67 notes
#Ray Bradbury  #Comic  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson 
Happy Birthday, Peter James, 22 August 1948
Seven Writing Tips
Read. Read. Read. Read books that have done well in the genre you want to write in.
I have this holy trinity of writing which consists of Character, Research, and Plot.  
Structure is important. Know your ending before you start writing. You wouldn’t just get into a car and drive without knowing where you’re going. Know your most important plot points. This does not mean that things won’t change, but you will never get stuck.
Writer’s Block doesn’t exist. If you have a plot with a proper outline you will never get Writer’s Block.  
Once you start writing a book, make time to write every single day. Find a comfortable number of words for you to write each day and stick to that number. I am comfortable with 1000 words.
Love your characters. Even your villains. And the way to make a villain lovable is to give him something to love.
And one from Graham Greene: ‘Every writer has to carry a chip of ice in their heart.’
Read The Writers Write Interview with Peter James
James is the British best-selling author of the Detective Roy Grace novels. He has sold more than 14 million novels.
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Peter James, 22 August 1948

Seven Writing Tips

  1. Read. Read. Read. Read books that have done well in the genre you want to write in.
  2. I have this holy trinity of writing which consists of Character, Research, and Plot.  
  3. Structure is important. Know your ending before you start writing. You wouldn’t just get into a car and drive without knowing where you’re going. Know your most important plot points. This does not mean that things won’t change, but you will never get stuck.
  4. Writer’s Block doesn’t exist. If you have a plot with a proper outline you will never get Writer’s Block.  
  5. Once you start writing a book, make time to write every single day. Find a comfortable number of words for you to write each day and stick to that number. I am comfortable with 1000 words.
  6. Love your characters. Even your villains. And the way to make a villain lovable is to give him something to love.
  7. And one from Graham Greene: ‘Every writer has to carry a chip of ice in their heart.’

Read The Writers Write Interview with Peter James

James is the British best-selling author of the Detective Roy Grace novels. He has sold more than 14 million novels.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 6 days ago with 80 notes
#Peter James  #Literary Birthday  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson