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I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

Quotable - Robertson Davies, born 28 August 1913, died 2 December 1995 (10 Quotes)

Quotable - Robertson Davies, born 28 August 1913, died 2 December 1995 (10 Quotes)

— 4 hours ago with 72 notes
#Robertson Davies  #Lit  #Quotes 
Literary Birthday - 28 August
Happy Birthday, Janet Frame, born 28 August 1924, died 29 January 2004
Seven Quotes
I like to see life with its teeth out.
Writing a novel is not merely going on a shopping expedition across the border to an unreal land: it is hours and years spent in the factories, the streets, the cathedrals of the imagination.
All writers are exiles wherever they live and their work is a lifelong journey towards the lost land.
Everything is always a story, but the loveliest ones are those that get written and are not torn up and are taken to a friend as payment for listening, for putting a wise keyhole to the ear of my mind.
There is no past, present or future. Using tenses to divide time is like making chalk marks on water.
A writer must stand on the rock of her self and her judgment or be swept away by the tide or sink in the quaking earth: there must be an inviolate place where the choices and decisions, however imperfect, are the writer’s own, where the decision must be as individual and solitary as birth or death.
I really love emailing, it’s like writing a poem in the sky.
Frame was a New Zealand author. She wrote 11 novels, four collections of short stories, a book of poetry, and three autobiographical volumes. Frame’s traumatic experiences as a young woman feature in Jane Campion’s popular film adaptation of An Angel at My Table. 
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 28 August

Happy Birthday, Janet Frame, born 28 August 1924, died 29 January 2004

Seven Quotes

  1. I like to see life with its teeth out.
  2. Writing a novel is not merely going on a shopping expedition across the border to an unreal land: it is hours and years spent in the factories, the streets, the cathedrals of the imagination.
  3. All writers are exiles wherever they live and their work is a lifelong journey towards the lost land.
  4. Everything is always a story, but the loveliest ones are those that get written and are not torn up and are taken to a friend as payment for listening, for putting a wise keyhole to the ear of my mind.
  5. There is no past, present or future. Using tenses to divide time is like making chalk marks on water.
  6. A writer must stand on the rock of her self and her judgment or be swept away by the tide or sink in the quaking earth: there must be an inviolate place where the choices and decisions, however imperfect, are the writer’s own, where the decision must be as individual and solitary as birth or death.
  7. I really love emailing, it’s like writing a poem in the sky.

Frame was a New Zealand author. She wrote 11 novels, four collections of short stories, a book of poetry, and three autobiographical volumes. Frame’s traumatic experiences as a young woman feature in Jane Campion’s popular film adaptation of An Angel at My Table

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 16 hours ago with 49 notes
#Janet Frame  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write  #Lit 
Literary Birthday - 28 August
Happy Birthday, Tasha Tudor, born 28 August 1915, died 18 June 2008
Three Quotes
Why do women want to dress like men when they’re fortunate enough to be women? Why lose femininity, which is one of our greatest charms? We get more accomplished by being charming than we would be flaunting around in pants and smoking. I’m very fond of men. I think they are wonderful creatures. I love them dearly. But I don’t want to look like one. 
Whenever I get one of those questionnaires and they ask what is your profession, I always put down housewife. It’s an admirable profession, why apologize for it. You aren’t stupid because you’re a housewife. When you’re stirring the jam you can read Shakespeare.
Life isn’t long enough to do all you could accomplish. And what a privilege even to be alive. In spite of all the pollutions and horrors, how beautiful this world is. Supposing you only saw the stars once every year. Think what you would think. The wonder of it!
Tudor is one of America’s best-known and beloved illustrators and authors. Her first little story, Pumpkin Moonshine, was published in 1938. She illustrated nearly 100 books, the last being the 2003 release, The Corgiville Christmas. She believed she had lived before, in the 1830s and lived on a Vermont farm wearing period dresses, spinning wool, raising goats, and cultivating a garden. 
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 28 August

Happy Birthday, Tasha Tudor, born 28 August 1915, died 18 June 2008

Three Quotes

  1. Why do women want to dress like men when they’re fortunate enough to be women? Why lose femininity, which is one of our greatest charms? We get more accomplished by being charming than we would be flaunting around in pants and smoking. I’m very fond of men. I think they are wonderful creatures. I love them dearly. But I don’t want to look like one. 
  2. Whenever I get one of those questionnaires and they ask what is your profession, I always put down housewife. It’s an admirable profession, why apologize for it. You aren’t stupid because you’re a housewife. When you’re stirring the jam you can read Shakespeare.
  3. Life isn’t long enough to do all you could accomplish. And what a privilege even to be alive. In spite of all the pollutions and horrors, how beautiful this world is. Supposing you only saw the stars once every year. Think what you would think. The wonder of it!

Tudor is one of America’s best-known and beloved illustrators and authors. Her first little story, Pumpkin Moonshine, was published in 1938. She illustrated nearly 100 books, the last being the 2003 release, The Corgiville ChristmasShe believed she had lived before, in the 1830s and lived on a Vermont farm wearing period dresses, spinning wool, raising goats, and cultivating a garden. 

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 17 hours ago with 59 notes
#Tasha Tudor  #lit  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
Quotable - Stephen Fry, born 24 August 1957
On Reading and Writing 

Quotable - Stephen Fry, born 24 August 1957

On Reading and Writing 

— 4 days ago with 79 notes
#stephen fry  #lit  #quotes 
"Only write to me, write to me, I love to see the hop and skip and sudden starts of your ink."
Quotable - A.S. Byatt, born 24 August 1936
— 4 days ago with 152 notes
#A.S. Byatt  #lit  #quotes 
Happy Birthday, Annie Proulx, born 22 August 193510 Quotes On Writing 

Happy Birthday, Annie Proulx, born 22 August 1935
10 Quotes On Writing 

— 6 days ago with 40 notes
#annie proulx  #Literary Birthday  #lit  #quotes 
Quotable - Robert Stone, born 21 August 1937About Robert Stone http://bit.ly/13EI56M

Quotable - Robert Stone, born 21 August 1937
About Robert Stone http://bit.ly/13EI56M

— 1 week ago with 39 notes
#Robert Stone  #Literary Birthday  #Lit  #Quotes 
Literary Birthday - 21 August
Happy Birthday, Jules Michelet, born 21 August 1798, died 9 February 1874
Woman is a miracle of divine contradictions
You are one of the forces of nature.
He who would confine his thought to present time will not understand present reality.
Achieving a goal is nothing. The getting there is everything.
He who knows how to be poor knows everything.
What manly eloquence could produce such an effect as woman’s silence?
The historian’s first duties are sacrilege and the mocking of false gods. They are his indispensable instruments for establishing the truth.
Michelet was a French historian best known for his monumental Histoire de France (History of France). Michelet was the first historian to use and define the word Renaissance as a period in Europe’s cultural history that represented a break from the Middle Ages. Michelet’s attempt to resurrect the past by putting his own personality in his narrative, resulted in a historical synthesis of great dramatic power.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 21 August

Happy Birthday, Jules Michelet, born 21 August 1798, died 9 February 1874

  1. Woman is a miracle of divine contradictions
  2. You are one of the forces of nature.
  3. He who would confine his thought to present time will not understand present reality.
  4. Achieving a goal is nothing. The getting there is everything.
  5. He who knows how to be poor knows everything.
  6. What manly eloquence could produce such an effect as woman’s silence?
  7. The historian’s first duties are sacrilege and the mocking of false gods. They are his indispensable instruments for establishing the truth.

Michelet was a French historian best known for his monumental Histoire de France (History of France). Michelet was the first historian to use and define the word Renaissance as a period in Europe’s cultural history that represented a break from the Middle Ages. Michelet’s attempt to resurrect the past by putting his own personality in his narrative, resulted in a historical synthesis of great dramatic power.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 25 notes
#Jules Michelet  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write  #lit 
The Character Biography – Writing more to write less →

Charles Dickens could get away with starting a story with the birth of his protagonist. J.D. Salinger chose not to start there and called it ‘all that David Copperfield kind of crap’. Now before I am lynched, let me say that I am a huge fan of Charles Dickens, but David Copperfield was published in 1850. Catcher in the Rye, although very advanced for its time, was published in 1945. Today we don’t write like either of these two authors.

This is 2014. What do we do?

  1. In The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins tells us simply that it is the day of the reaping. She doesn’t explain it or tell us what it means. 
  2. In The Fault in Our Stars, John Green jumps in by telling us seventeen-year-old Hazel is depressed because she has cancer. She is in a support group almost before we hit page two. 
  3. In Room by Emma Donoghue, Jack wakes up on his fifth birthday. He is in Bed and switches on Lamp and has an interesting conversation with Ma. We know something is up and weird, but Emma strings us along. She tells us nothing. 
  4. In The Good Luck of Right Now, Matthew Quick writes about Bartholomew Neil who is clearing out his deceased mother’s underwear drawer and finds a form letter from Richard Gere. The death of his mother and his one-sided correspondence with Mr Gere takes us on a journey that is at once sad, sweet and enchanting.

Now, this is not a post about inciting moments although each one is a brilliant example of a moment of action and change. This is in fact a post about character biographies.

Imagine if I started my post with: To begin my post with the beginning of my post, I record that I wrote (as I have been informed and believe) on a Sunday night at eight o’clock while everyone else was watching the Sunday night movie. (I ain’t no Dickens, that’s for sure.) 

How do great modern authors create characters so complete that I am interested in them even though I only met them a page ago? 

Read more here

— 1 week ago with 109 notes
#The Character Biography – Writing more to write less  #Writing Advice  #Lit  #Mia Botha  #Writers Write 
"At every moment of our lives, we all have one foot in a fairy tale and the other in the abyss."
Paulo Coelho
— 1 week ago with 1310 notes
#Paulo Coelho  #Lit  #Quotes