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Quotable - Graham Greene, born 2 October 1904, died 3 April 1991

Quotable - Graham Greene, born 2 October 1904, died 3 April 1991

— 5 hours ago with 30 notes
#Graham Greene  #Literary Birthday  #Lit  #Quotes 
Happy Birthday, Elizabeth Montagu, born 2 October 1718, died 25 August 1800
Five Quotes
I endeavour to be wise when I cannot be merry, easy when I cannot be glad, content with what cannot be mended and patient when there be no redress.
I never invite idiots to my house.
Wit in women is apt to have bad consequences; like a sword without a scabbard, it wounds the wearer and provokes assailants.
Any wife will save you from purgatory, and a diligent one will secure heaven to you.
Few people know anything of the English history but what they learn from Shakespeare; for our story is rather a tissue of personal adventures and catastrophes than a series of political events.
Montagu was a British social reformer, patron of the arts, literary critic, and writer. She helped organise and lead the bluestocking society. She is the author of An Essay on the Writings and Genius of Shakespeare .
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Elizabeth Montagu, born 2 October 1718, died 25 August 1800

Five Quotes

  1. I endeavour to be wise when I cannot be merry, easy when I cannot be glad, content with what cannot be mended and patient when there be no redress.
  2. I never invite idiots to my house.
  3. Wit in women is apt to have bad consequences; like a sword without a scabbard, it wounds the wearer and provokes assailants.
  4. Any wife will save you from purgatory, and a diligent one will secure heaven to you.
  5. Few people know anything of the English history but what they learn from Shakespeare; for our story is rather a tissue of personal adventures and catastrophes than a series of political events.

Montagu was a British social reformer, patron of the arts, literary critic, and writer. She helped organise and lead the bluestocking society. She is the author of An Essay on the Writings and Genius of Shakespeare .

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 9 hours ago with 58 notes
#Elizabeth Montagu  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson 
Happy Birthday, Faith Baldwin, born 1 October 1893, died 18 March 1978
Seven Quotes
Time is a dressmaker specialising in alterations.
No year of life is emotionally, spiritually or even materially, all drought or all rainfall; nor is it all sun. The road turns a little every day, and one day there’s a sudden twist we didn’t dream was there, and for every loss there is somewhere a gain, for every grief a happiness, for every deprivation a giving.
Sometimes there is a greater lack of communication in facile talking than in silence.
You cannot contribute anything to the ideal condition of mind and heart known as Brotherhood, however much you preach, posture, or agree, unless you live it.
We, too, the children of the earth, have our moon phases all through any year; the darkness, the delivery from darkness, the waxing and waning. 
Character builds slowly, but it can be torn down within incredible swiftness.
Only children and a few spiritually evolved people are born to feel gratitude as naturally as they breathe, without even thinking. Most of us come to it step by painful step, to discover that gratitude is a form of acceptance.
Baldwin was a successful American author of romance and fiction. She published 100 novels and became a best-selling writer.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Faith Baldwin, born 1 October 1893, died 18 March 1978

Seven Quotes

  1. Time is a dressmaker specialising in alterations.
  2. No year of life is emotionally, spiritually or even materially, all drought or all rainfall; nor is it all sun. The road turns a little every day, and one day there’s a sudden twist we didn’t dream was there, and for every loss there is somewhere a gain, for every grief a happiness, for every deprivation a giving.
  3. Sometimes there is a greater lack of communication in facile talking than in silence.
  4. You cannot contribute anything to the ideal condition of mind and heart known as Brotherhood, however much you preach, posture, or agree, unless you live it.
  5. We, too, the children of the earth, have our moon phases all through any year; the darkness, the delivery from darkness, the waxing and waning. 
  6. Character builds slowly, but it can be torn down within incredible swiftness.
  7. Only children and a few spiritually evolved people are born to feel gratitude as naturally as they breathe, without even thinking. Most of us come to it step by painful step, to discover that gratitude is a form of acceptance.

Baldwin was a successful American author of romance and fiction. She published 100 novels and became a best-selling writer.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 day ago with 31 notes
#Faith Baldwin  #Amanda Patterson  #Literary Birthday 
Quotable - Truman Capote, born 30 September 1924, died 25 August 1984

Quotable - Truman Capote, born 30 September 1924, died 25 August 1984

— 2 days ago with 83 notes
#truman capote  #Literary Birthday  #lit  #quotes 
Happy Birthday, Laura Esquivel, born 30 September 1950
Seven Quotes
To know how to produce a work of art is to know how to discard the extraneous.
Desires and words go hand in hand … they are moved by the same intention to join together, to communicate, to establish bridges between people, whether they are spoken or written.
The simple truth is that the truth does not exist, it all depends on a person’s point of view.
[Words] cling to the very core of our memories and lie there in silence until a new desire reawakens them and recharges them with loving energy…. Like water, words are a wonderful conductor of energy. And the most powerful, transforming energy is the energy of love.
You don’t have to think about love; you either feel it or you don’t.
Whoever controls information, whoever controls meaning, acquires power.
No one who loves life can ignore literature, and no one who loves literature can ignore life.
Esquivel is a Mexican novelist, essayist, and screenwriter. She is well known for her novel, Like Water for Chocolate.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Laura Esquivel, born 30 September 1950

Seven Quotes

  1. To know how to produce a work of art is to know how to discard the extraneous.
  2. Desires and words go hand in hand … they are moved by the same intention to join together, to communicate, to establish bridges between people, whether they are spoken or written.
  3. The simple truth is that the truth does not exist, it all depends on a person’s point of view.
  4. [Words] cling to the very core of our memories and lie there in silence until a new desire reawakens them and recharges them with loving energy…. Like water, words are a wonderful conductor of energy. And the most powerful, transforming energy is the energy of love.
  5. You don’t have to think about love; you either feel it or you don’t.
  6. Whoever controls information, whoever controls meaning, acquires power.
  7. No one who loves life can ignore literature, and no one who loves literature can ignore life.

Esquivel is a Mexican novelist, essayist, and screenwriter. She is well known for her novel, Like Water for Chocolate.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 2 days ago with 42 notes
#Laura Esquivel  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson 
Happy Birthday, Elizabeth Gaskell, born 29 September 1810, died 12 November 1865
Five Quotes
Sometimes one likes foolish people for their folly, better than wise people for their wisdom.
People may flatter themselves just as much by thinking that their faults are always present to other people’s minds, as if they believe that the world is always contemplating their individual charms and virtues.
God has made us so that we must be mutually dependent. We may ignore our own dependence, or refuse to acknowledge that others depend upon us in more respects than the payment of weekly wages; but the thing must be, nevertheless. Neither you nor any other master can help yourselves. The most proudly independent man depends on those around him for their insensible influence on his character - his life.
Similarity of opinion is not always—I think not often—needed for fullness and perfection of love.
The future must be met, however stern and iron it be.
Gaskell was a British novelist and short story writer during the Victorian era. Her novels offer a detailed portrait of society and are of interest to social historians as well as lovers of literature.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Elizabeth Gaskell, born 29 September 1810, died 12 November 1865

Five Quotes

  1. Sometimes one likes foolish people for their folly, better than wise people for their wisdom.
  2. People may flatter themselves just as much by thinking that their faults are always present to other people’s minds, as if they believe that the world is always contemplating their individual charms and virtues.
  3. God has made us so that we must be mutually dependent. We may ignore our own dependence, or refuse to acknowledge that others depend upon us in more respects than the payment of weekly wages; but the thing must be, nevertheless. Neither you nor any other master can help yourselves. The most proudly independent man depends on those around him for their insensible influence on his character - his life.
  4. Similarity of opinion is not always—I think not often—needed for fullness and perfection of love.
  5. The future must be met, however stern and iron it be.

Gaskell was a British novelist and short story writer during the Victorian era. Her novels offer a detailed portrait of society and are of interest to social historians as well as lovers of literature.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 3 days ago with 119 notes
#elizabeth gaskell  #Amanda patterson  #Literary Birthday 
Happy Birthday, Piper Kerman, born September 28, 1969
Five Quotes
Well, the act of documenting your story and telling your story the way you want to tell it is really important, especially for folks who are outcasts and have been shamed.
I think that if you set out to write a story about the biggest mistakes you’ve ever made, the worst things you’ve ever done as a person, you have a responsibility to be honest. But also the inherent challenge of writing is you have to have a protagonist that the reader wants to stay with. 
We have a racially based justice system that over-punishes, fails to rehabilitate, and doesn’t make us safer.
Prison is quite literally a ghetto in the most classic sense of the world, a place where the U.S. government now puts not only the dangerous but also the inconvenient—people who are mentally ill, people who are addicts, people who are poor and uneducated and unskilled.
Every human being makes mistakes and does things they’re not proud of. They can be everyday, or they can be catastrophic. And the unfortunate truth of being human is that we all have moments of indifference to other people’s suffering. To me, that’s the central thing that allows crime to happen: indifference to other people’s suffering. 
Kerman is the author of the memoir, Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison. 
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Piper Kerman, born September 28, 1969

Five Quotes

  1. Well, the act of documenting your story and telling your story the way you want to tell it is really important, especially for folks who are outcasts and have been shamed.
  2. I think that if you set out to write a story about the biggest mistakes you’ve ever made, the worst things you’ve ever done as a person, you have a responsibility to be honest. But also the inherent challenge of writing is you have to have a protagonist that the reader wants to stay with. 
  3. We have a racially based justice system that over-punishes, fails to rehabilitate, and doesn’t make us safer.
  4. Prison is quite literally a ghetto in the most classic sense of the world, a place where the U.S. government now puts not only the dangerous but also the inconvenient—people who are mentally ill, people who are addicts, people who are poor and uneducated and unskilled.
  5. Every human being makes mistakes and does things they’re not proud of. They can be everyday, or they can be catastrophic. And the unfortunate truth of being human is that we all have moments of indifference to other people’s suffering. To me, that’s the central thing that allows crime to happen: indifference to other people’s suffering. 

Kerman is the author of the memoir, Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 4 days ago with 32 notes
#Piper Kerman  #Amanda Patterson  #Literary Birthday 
Happy Birthday, Louis Auchincloss, born 27 September 1917, died 26 January 2010
Nine Quotes
Society matters not so much. Words are everything.
A man can spend his whole existence never learning the simple lesson that he has only one life and that if he fails to do what he wants with it, nobody else really cares.
Only little boys and old men sneer at love.
Perfection irritates as well as it attracts, in fiction as in life.
A neurotic can perfectly well be a literary genius, but his greatest danger is always that he will not recognize when he is dull.
A lot of writers … sit in a log cabin by the lake and put their feet up by the fire in the silence and write. If you can have that that’s all very well, but the true writer will learn to write anywhere — even in prison.
Great lovers have made great sacrifices.
It’s very rare that a character comes to mind complete in himself. He needs additional traits that I often pick from actual people. One way you can cover your tracks is to change the sex.
Your literary style reflects your personality.
Auchincloss was an American lawyer, novelist, historian, and essayist. He is best known as a novelist who explored the experiences and psychology of American polite society and old money.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Louis Auchincloss, born 27 September 1917, died 26 January 2010

Nine Quotes

  1. Society matters not so much. Words are everything.
  2. A man can spend his whole existence never learning the simple lesson that he has only one life and that if he fails to do what he wants with it, nobody else really cares.
  3. Only little boys and old men sneer at love.
  4. Perfection irritates as well as it attracts, in fiction as in life.
  5. A neurotic can perfectly well be a literary genius, but his greatest danger is always that he will not recognize when he is dull.
  6. A lot of writers … sit in a log cabin by the lake and put their feet up by the fire in the silence and write. If you can have that that’s all very well, but the true writer will learn to write anywhere — even in prison.
  7. Great lovers have made great sacrifices.
  8. It’s very rare that a character comes to mind complete in himself. He needs additional traits that I often pick from actual people. One way you can cover your tracks is to change the sex.
  9. Your literary style reflects your personality.

Auchincloss was an American lawyer, novelist, historian, and essayist. He is best known as a novelist who explored the experiences and psychology of American polite society and old money.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 5 days ago with 48 notes
#Louis Auchincloss  #Amanda Patterson  #Literary Birthday 
Literary Birthday - 26 September
Happy Birthday, Minette Walters, born 26 September 1949
Five Quotes
When I set out to write my story, I did so with the absolute understanding that the people who read it would be intelligent.
I have always been fascinated by the challenge that crime fiction represents to an author. I wanted to know if I could carry an intricate plot for 100,000 words, and keep readers guessing, while I was portraying characters under considerable tension. 
My two best working times are from early morning to about 1.30pm and then from about 5pm until 8pm or later. 
My major hobby and the way I always unwind is to decorate my house while listening to the many excellent BBC stations on the radio. 
The Ice House took me two years to write. a year for my agent to sell it and a year before it was published. By that time I had already finished The Sculptress. It takes me about a year to write a thriller now.
Walters is an English crime writer. She has written 15 books, five of which have been adapted for television, including The Sculptress, The Ice House, The Scold’s Bridle, The Echo, and The Dark Room.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 26 September

Happy Birthday, Minette Walters, born 26 September 1949

Five Quotes

  1. When I set out to write my story, I did so with the absolute understanding that the people who read it would be intelligent.
  2. I have always been fascinated by the challenge that crime fiction represents to an author. I wanted to know if I could carry an intricate plot for 100,000 words, and keep readers guessing, while I was portraying characters under considerable tension. 
  3. My two best working times are from early morning to about 1.30pm and then from about 5pm until 8pm or later. 
  4. My major hobby and the way I always unwind is to decorate my house while listening to the many excellent BBC stations on the radio. 
  5. The Ice House took me two years to write. a year for my agent to sell it and a year before it was published. By that time I had already finished The Sculptress. It takes me about a year to write a thriller now.

Walters is an English crime writer. She has written 15 books, five of which have been adapted for television, including The SculptressThe Ice HouseThe Scold’s BridleThe Echo, and The Dark Room.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 6 days ago with 26 notes
#Minette Walters  #lit  #Literary Birthday  #amanda patterson  #writers write 
Quotable - F. Scott Fitzgerald, born 24 September 1896, died 21 December 194012 F.Scott Fitzgerald Quotes on Writing bit.ly/18nsOVG

Quotable - F. Scott Fitzgerald, born 24 September 1896, died 21 December 1940
12 F.Scott Fitzgerald Quotes on Writing bit.ly/18nsOVG

— 1 week ago with 133 notes
#f. scott fitzgerald  #Literary Birthday  #lit  #quotes 
Happy Birthday, Eleanor Catton, born 24 September 1985
10 Quotes
Teaching is a great complement to writing. It’s very social and gets you out of your own head. It’s also very optimistic. It renews itself every year - it’s a renewable resource.
I much prefer a plotted novel to a novel that is really conceptual.
I think that writers of literary fiction would do well to read more books for children.
When I was writing ‘The Luminaries,’ I read a lot of crime novels because I wanted to figure out which ones made me go, ‘Ah! I didn’t know that was coming!’
I see disappointment as something small and aggregate rather than something unified or great. With a little effort, every failure can be turned into something good.
I think that you have to keep the reader front and centre if you’re going to write something that people are going to love and be entertained by.
What I like about fiction most is that it resists closure and exists, if the reader is willing to engage, as a possible encounter – an encounter that is like meeting a human being.
I think that’s what fiction writing is actually all about. It’s about trying to solve problems in creative ways.
I believe really strongly in imitation, actually: I think it’s the first place you need to go to if you’re going to be able to understand how something works. True mimicry is actually quite difficult.
I think that, in principle, a workshop is such a beautiful idea - an environment in which writers who are collectively apprenticed to the craft of writing can come together in order to collectively improve.
Catton is a New Zealand author. Her second novel, The Luminaries, won the 2013 Man Booker Prize.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Eleanor Catton, born 24 September 1985

10 Quotes

  1. Teaching is a great complement to writing. It’s very social and gets you out of your own head. It’s also very optimistic. It renews itself every year - it’s a renewable resource.
  2. I much prefer a plotted novel to a novel that is really conceptual.
  3. I think that writers of literary fiction would do well to read more books for children.
  4. When I was writing ‘The Luminaries,’ I read a lot of crime novels because I wanted to figure out which ones made me go, ‘Ah! I didn’t know that was coming!’
  5. I see disappointment as something small and aggregate rather than something unified or great. With a little effort, every failure can be turned into something good.
  6. I think that you have to keep the reader front and centre if you’re going to write something that people are going to love and be entertained by.
  7. What I like about fiction most is that it resists closure and exists, if the reader is willing to engage, as a possible encounter – an encounter that is like meeting a human being.
  8. I think that’s what fiction writing is actually all about. It’s about trying to solve problems in creative ways.
  9. I believe really strongly in imitation, actually: I think it’s the first place you need to go to if you’re going to be able to understand how something works. True mimicry is actually quite difficult.
  10. I think that, in principle, a workshop is such a beautiful idea - an environment in which writers who are collectively apprenticed to the craft of writing can come together in order to collectively improve.

Catton is a New Zealand author. Her second novel, The Luminaries, won the 2013 Man Booker Prize.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 66 notes
#Amanda Patterson  #Eleanor Catton  #Literary Birthday 
Happy Birthday, Frank Cottrell Boyce, born 23 September 1959
10 Quotes
I write because it’s a chance to remind people of just how miraculous and amazing ordinary things are.
I think it’s really important who you write for. A lot of writers say they write to please themselves, which is really pure and good, but I was taken aback when I went to Misheel’s school by how much I wanted to reach the children, please them, make them laugh.
I don’t think films ever change people the way books change people.
I was no great shakes at primary school. Then I got ill and had to stay in bed for a few days and that’s when I read Ursula le Guinrsqus A Wizard of Earthsea - and the way she writes about magic and knowledge in that book made me see for the first time that knowing stuff and learning things was really important and exciting. That book made me clever! In a single afternoon. I’ve never forgotten just how much I owe and what a massive impact that book had on me.
Being read to at school changed my life.
Keep a diary. Not a big soulful one. Buy yourself an oxfam diary – which has great pictures but not much room to write – and just write one sentence per day. Not about yourself. About something funny / sad / strange you saw or heard. It’s a great discipline and at the end, you’ve got a really good read.
I want them to laugh. It’s important to me. There are a lot of people telling kids life isn’t worth living. I want to tell them it’s great.
When I was in year six, I wrote an essay in class that had some jokes in it. The teacher thought it was funny so she read it out to the class. 
Novels are hard because you’ve got to have total faith in yourself and no one is going to reassure you till you’ve finished. You start getting feedback from your screenplay before you start writing. With a book, you’re on your own.
People possess books in the way they never do film. You live with a book for weeks and books soak up the circumstances in which you read them. You remember you read it on the beach, or on the train. You own a book in the way you never own a film.
Boyce is a British screenwriter and novelist, known for his children’s fiction and for his collaborations with film director Michael Winterbottom. Boyce won the 2004 Carnegie Medal for Millions, and the 2012 Guardian Prize for The Unforgotten Coat.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Frank Cottrell Boyce, born 23 September 1959

10 Quotes

  1. I write because it’s a chance to remind people of just how miraculous and amazing ordinary things are.
  2. I think it’s really important who you write for. A lot of writers say they write to please themselves, which is really pure and good, but I was taken aback when I went to Misheel’s school by how much I wanted to reach the children, please them, make them laugh.
  3. I don’t think films ever change people the way books change people.
  4. I was no great shakes at primary school. Then I got ill and had to stay in bed for a few days and that’s when I read Ursula le Guinrsqus A Wizard of Earthsea - and the way she writes about magic and knowledge in that book made me see for the first time that knowing stuff and learning things was really important and exciting. That book made me clever! In a single afternoon. I’ve never forgotten just how much I owe and what a massive impact that book had on me.
  5. Being read to at school changed my life.
  6. Keep a diary. Not a big soulful one. Buy yourself an oxfam diary – which has great pictures but not much room to write – and just write one sentence per day. Not about yourself. About something funny / sad / strange you saw or heard. It’s a great discipline and at the end, you’ve got a really good read.
  7. I want them to laugh. It’s important to me. There are a lot of people telling kids life isn’t worth living. I want to tell them it’s great.
  8. When I was in year six, I wrote an essay in class that had some jokes in it. The teacher thought it was funny so she read it out to the class. 
  9. Novels are hard because you’ve got to have total faith in yourself and no one is going to reassure you till you’ve finished. You start getting feedback from your screenplay before you start writing. With a book, you’re on your own.
  10. People possess books in the way they never do film. You live with a book for weeks and books soak up the circumstances in which you read them. You remember you read it on the beach, or on the train. You own a book in the way you never own a film.

Boyce is a British screenwriter and novelist, known for his children’s fiction and for his collaborations with film director Michael Winterbottom. Boyce won the 2004 Carnegie Medal for Millions, and the 2012 Guardian Prize for The Unforgotten Coat.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 73 notes
#Frank Cottrell Boyce  #Amanda Patterson  #Literary Birthday 
Happy Birthday, Alice Meynell, born 22 September 1847, died 27 November 1922
Seven Quotes
Happiness is not a matter of events, it depends upon the tides of the mind.
There is something very cheerful and courageous in the setting-out of a child on a journey of speech with so small baggage and with so much confidence.
If life is not always poetical, it is at least metrical.
Dialect is the elf rather than the genius of place.
If there is a look of human eyes that tells of perpetual loneliness, so there is also the familiar look that is the sign of perpetual crowds.
The sense of humour has other things to do than to make itself conspicuous in the act of laughter.
Difficult thoughts are quite distinct from difficult words. Difficulty of thought is the very heart of poetry.
Meynell was an English writer, editor, critic, and suffragist. She is remembered mainly as a poet.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Alice Meynell, born 22 September 1847, died 27 November 1922

Seven Quotes

  1. Happiness is not a matter of events, it depends upon the tides of the mind.
  2. There is something very cheerful and courageous in the setting-out of a child on a journey of speech with so small baggage and with so much confidence.
  3. If life is not always poetical, it is at least metrical.
  4. Dialect is the elf rather than the genius of place.
  5. If there is a look of human eyes that tells of perpetual loneliness, so there is also the familiar look that is the sign of perpetual crowds.
  6. The sense of humour has other things to do than to make itself conspicuous in the act of laughter.
  7. Difficult thoughts are quite distinct from difficult words. Difficulty of thought is the very heart of poetry.

Meynell was an English writer, editor, critic, and suffragist. She is remembered mainly as a poet.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 35 notes
#Alice Meynell  #Amanda Patterson  #Literary Birthday