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I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

Happy Birthday, William H. Gass, born 30 July 1924
10 Quotes
Getting even is one reason for writing.
Sports, politics, and religion are the three passions of the badly educated.
For me, the short story is not a character sketch, a mouse trap, an epiphany, a slice of suburban life. It is the flowering of a symbol center. It is a poem grafted onto sturdier stock.
The true alchemists do not change lead into gold; they change the world into words.
Of course there is enough to stir our wonder anywhere; there’s enough to love, anywhere, if one is strong enough, if one is diligent enough, if one is perceptive, patient, kind enough — whatever it takes.
I write because I hate. A lot. Hard.
For the speedy reader paragraphs become a country the eye flies over looking for landmarks, reference points, airports, restrooms, passages of sex.
It’s not the word made flesh we want in writing, in poetry and fiction, but the flesh made word.
A cause is a lie with a fan club.
In general, I would think that at present prose writers are much in advance of the poets. In the old days, I read more poetry than prose, but now it is in prose where you find things being put together well, where there is great ambition, and equal talent. Poets have gotten so careless, it is a disgrace. You can’t pick up a page. All the words slide off.
Gass is an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and critic. He has won three National Book Critics Circle Award prizes and the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism. He received the American Book Award for his 1995 novel The Tunnel .
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, William H. Gass, born 30 July 1924

10 Quotes

  1. Getting even is one reason for writing.
  2. Sports, politics, and religion are the three passions of the badly educated.
  3. For me, the short story is not a character sketch, a mouse trap, an epiphany, a slice of suburban life. It is the flowering of a symbol center. It is a poem grafted onto sturdier stock.
  4. The true alchemists do not change lead into gold; they change the world into words.
  5. Of course there is enough to stir our wonder anywhere; there’s enough to love, anywhere, if one is strong enough, if one is diligent enough, if one is perceptive, patient, kind enough — whatever it takes.
  6. I write because I hate. A lot. Hard.
  7. For the speedy reader paragraphs become a country the eye flies over looking for landmarks, reference points, airports, restrooms, passages of sex.
  8. It’s not the word made flesh we want in writing, in poetry and fiction, but the flesh made word.
  9. A cause is a lie with a fan club.
  10. In general, I would think that at present prose writers are much in advance of the poets. In the old days, I read more poetry than prose, but now it is in prose where you find things being put together well, where there is great ambition, and equal talent. Poets have gotten so careless, it is a disgrace. You can’t pick up a page. All the words slide off.

Gass is an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and critic. He has won three National Book Critics Circle Award prizes and the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism. He received the American Book Award for his 1995 novel The Tunnel .

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 13 hours ago with 39 notes
#william h. gass  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
Seven Things I've Learnt From Meeting Memorable Writers →

Confessions of a book club host

I have met, interviewed, and hosted more authors at literary dinners than I can remember. I have watched these authors speak to my guests, answer my questions and sell their books for more than 10 years. Some of the writers are forgettable, but many have left lasting positive impressions. This has very little to do with how famous they are, and more to do with how they behave.

So, what are the seven things these memorable writers have in common?

1.   They are well-mannered
Manners are more important than people realise. My favourite authors have all been considerate. They switch off their cell phones. They are punctual. They are present. They remember people’s names, and they make an effort to engage with people.

2.   They have led interesting lives
This does not mean that they have visited every continent or led dangerous lives. It means they are widely read and open-minded. Their interests have led them to meet interesting people through research and shared passions. They interact with other interesting people. It is a fact that the people we spend time with change the way we behave. They determine the people we become.

3.   They are not boring
They keep their answers brief. This does not mean they are stilted or cold, but they actually answer the questions people ask them. They are positive about their work. They talk about new books they’re working on. They do not boast about their accomplishments.

4.   They are great listeners
They may love to talk about themselves – don’t we all? – but they refrain from overdoing it. They understand the art of conversation, and they listen to people who interview them, and to the people they meet. Authors who make an excellent impression do not say too much. The people we like the most know when to keep quiet.

5.   They have a few great anecdotes
Readers and guests are not there to find out random trivia that might be on an author’s mind. They want to know about their books, and their writing habits. They are interested in personal lives in relation to the author’s work. If an author has been married five times, the audience will want to know how each spouse affected the books they wrote. ‘Did spouse number three serve as inspiration for a villain?’ ‘How do they manage to write with young children?’ The best guests have short stories that entertain, inform and engage.

6.   They are charming
It is not all about words. Tone of voice and body language are just as important. Memorable authors laugh and smile. They engage with people, shake hands, and they are attentive. When they speak about their books they are passionate. They talk to each reader as they sign their books.

7.   They are fascinated by people, places, and things
They are not jaded. Even if they have done this a thousand times, they are eager to meet people, find out about the city they are visiting, and the venue for the book launch. People who meet them feel as if they have shared a new experience with that author. Their enthusiasm is infectious. Research shows excitement is often associated with the person you’re with.

Before you represent yourself, and your book, in public it’s a good idea to remember the people you’re meeting are your fans.

I will be hosting best-selling crime author, Peter James on 7 August 2014.

 by Amanda Patterson

[Some of the authors Amanda has hosted at literary events, and/or interviewed, include Alan HollinghurstAlexander McCall-Smith, Andre BrinkAndrew Gross, Angela Makholwa , Bryce CourtenayElizabeth Noble, George Bizos, Ian Rankin, James Hendry, Jassy McKenzie, Jeffery DeaverJeffrey Archer, Jill Mansell, Joanne HarrisJodi PicoultJohn ConnollyJohn van de RuitKaren RoseLauren BeukesLesley PearseMandy WienerMarian Keyes, Marina Lewycka, Mavis CheekMichael ConnellyMichael Robotham, Pamela Jooste, Philippa Gregory, Santa Montefiore, Stephen Leather, and Susan Lewis.]

— 1 day ago with 109 notes
#Seven Things I've Learnt From Meeting Memorable Writers  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
Happy Birthday, Antonio Machado, born 26 July 1875, died 22 February 1939
Five Quotes
In order to write poetry, you must first invent a poet who will write it.
Traveller, there is no path - Paths are made by walking.
Don’t try to rush things: for the cup to run over, it must first be filled.
My philosophy is fundamentally sad, but I’m not a sad man, and I don’t believe I sadden anyone else. In other words, the fact that I don’t put my philosophy into practice saves me from its evil spell, or, rather, my faith in the human race is stronger then my intellectual analysis of it; there lies the fountain of youth in which my heart is continually bathing.
Beyond living and dreaming there is something more important. Waking up.
Machado was a Spanish poet and one of the leading figures of the Spanish literary movement known as the Generation of ‘98.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Antonio Machado, born 26 July 1875, died 22 February 1939

Five Quotes

  1. In order to write poetry, you must first invent a poet who will write it.
  2. Traveller, there is no path - Paths are made by walking.
  3. Don’t try to rush things: for the cup to run over, it must first be filled.
  4. My philosophy is fundamentally sad, but I’m not a sad man, and I don’t believe I sadden anyone else. In other words, the fact that I don’t put my philosophy into practice saves me from its evil spell, or, rather, my faith in the human race is stronger then my intellectual analysis of it; there lies the fountain of youth in which my heart is continually bathing.
  5. Beyond living and dreaming there is something more important. Waking up.

Machado was a Spanish poet and one of the leading figures of the Spanish literary movement known as the Generation of ‘98.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 4 days ago with 56 notes
#Antonio Machado  #Literary Birthday  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson 
Literary Birthday - 26 July
Happy Birthday, Nicholas Evans, born 26 July 1950
Five Quotes On Writing
Read, read, and read. Then, when you think you’ve read enough and might know how to do it, find a story that moves you and tell it from the heart.
Try not to copy anyone’s style and don’t think about the reader, just write for yourself.
Be your characters, inhabit their heads; never bend the characters to fit the story; write what is true to them.
Starting to write is a bit like going for a hike in a place you have never before visited with people you know little about. Before you set out, you study the map and then you drive there, put on your boots and your backpack of research and set off up the trail. At first, the characters you are hiking with will be like silhouettes; maybe you know just one or two key things about them. Once you start walking, you have to ask yourself all kinds of questions about them. Where was she born? What was his relationship like with his father? Did she go to college? Can she catch a ball, sail, speak French? Who was his first love? As you answer these questions, so the silhouettes begin to fill in and after a few miles you are getting to know who they are.
[I write from] about 9.30am until around 7pm – then I go for a run and try to figure out what went wrong.
Evans is an English journalist, screenwriter, television and film producer and novelist. He is best known for The Horse Whisperer.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 26 July

Happy Birthday, Nicholas Evans, born 26 July 1950

Five Quotes On Writing

  1. Read, read, and read. Then, when you think you’ve read enough and might know how to do it, find a story that moves you and tell it from the heart.
  2. Try not to copy anyone’s style and don’t think about the reader, just write for yourself.
  3. Be your characters, inhabit their heads; never bend the characters to fit the story; write what is true to them.
  4. Starting to write is a bit like going for a hike in a place you have never before visited with people you know little about. Before you set out, you study the map and then you drive there, put on your boots and your backpack of research and set off up the trail. At first, the characters you are hiking with will be like silhouettes; maybe you know just one or two key things about them. Once you start walking, you have to ask yourself all kinds of questions about them. Where was she born? What was his relationship like with his father? Did she go to college? Can she catch a ball, sail, speak French? Who was his first love? As you answer these questions, so the silhouettes begin to fill in and after a few miles you are getting to know who they are.
  5. [I write from] about 9.30am until around 7pm – then I go for a run and try to figure out what went wrong.

Evans is an English journalist, screenwriter, television and film producer and novelist. He is best known for The Horse Whisperer.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 4 days ago with 54 notes
#Nicholas Evans  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
The Four Reasons To Use Dramatic Irony In Your Story →

When we teach our Writers Write course, we find that people are often unsure about using dramatic irony.

Dramatic Irony - What is it?

Dramatic irony is a story-telling device. It is when you give your reader plot information that the main character doesn’t have until later on in the story. Sometimes you want to keep all the characters in the dark about a major plot point that will only be revealed in the climax.

The Ironic Statement

When using dramatic irony, it should tie in with your theme. The characters must make a statement in the story, through dialogue or action, which throws the absurdity, danger, or emotion of the scene into relief. The dialogue will usually have a changed or opposite meaning. Similarly, the action will be misconstrued in some way, or cause a complication.

Here are the four reasons why you would use dramatic irony in a story, together with four examples, and their ironic statements. 

by Anthony Ehlers for Writers Write

— 6 days ago with 124 notes
#The Four Reasons To Use Dramatic Irony In Your Story  #Writing Advice  #Lit  #Anthony Ehlers  #Writers Write 
Happy Birthday, Alexandre Dumas, born 24 July 1802, died 5 December 1870
12 Quotes
Learning does not make one learned: there are those who have knowledge and those who have understanding. The first requires memory and the second philosophy.
One’s work may be finished someday, but one’s education never.
Infatuated, half through conceit, half through love of my art, I achieve the impossible working as no one else ever works.
There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.
There are two distinct sorts of ideas: Those that proceed from the head and those that emanate from the heart.
In business, sir, one has no friends, only correspondents.
Life is a storm, my young friend. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes.
As a general rule…people ask for advice only in order not to follow it; or if they do follow it, in order to have someone to blame for giving it.
The difference between treason and patriotism is only a matter of dates.
There are two ways of seeing: with the body and with the soul. The body’s sight can sometimes forget, but the soul remembers forever.
True love always makes a man better, no matter what woman inspires it.
Your life story is a novel; and people, though they love novels bound between two yellow paper covers, are oddly suspicious of those which come to them in living vellum, even when they are gilded.
Dumas was a French writer. He is most famous for historical adventure novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Alexandre Dumas, born 24 July 1802, died 5 December 1870

12 Quotes

  1. Learning does not make one learned: there are those who have knowledge and those who have understanding. The first requires memory and the second philosophy.
  2. One’s work may be finished someday, but one’s education never.
  3. Infatuated, half through conceit, half through love of my art, I achieve the impossible working as no one else ever works.
  4. There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.
  5. There are two distinct sorts of ideas: Those that proceed from the head and those that emanate from the heart.
  6. In business, sir, one has no friends, only correspondents.
  7. Life is a storm, my young friend. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes.
  8. As a general rule…people ask for advice only in order not to follow it; or if they do follow it, in order to have someone to blame for giving it.
  9. The difference between treason and patriotism is only a matter of dates.
  10. There are two ways of seeing: with the body and with the soul. The body’s sight can sometimes forget, but the soul remembers forever.
  11. True love always makes a man better, no matter what woman inspires it.
  12. Your life story is a novel; and people, though they love novels bound between two yellow paper covers, are oddly suspicious of those which come to them in living vellum, even when they are gilded.

Dumas was a French writer. He is most famous for historical adventure novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 6 days ago with 355 notes
#Alexandre Dumas  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #writers write 
Writing a Memoir: The Ultimate Selfie →

Apparently, it’s simple. You flip the camera on your phone, extend your arm and snap away. It’s not so easy for me. It takes practice, a long arm and a certain degree of confidence.

Whether you love them or hate them, avoid them or post them, selfies are here to stay. ‘Selfie’ was even selected as word of the year for 2013 by Oxford Dictionaries

Selfie Culture

Selfies are also getting a lot of flak. People who post a lot of selfies have been accused of alienating people. They are said to be shallow and have low self-esteem because they need constant approval and are prone to superficial relationships. The selfie-obsessed seem to be down-right narcissistic. Some people go so far as to call them mentally ill. (Daily Mail)

On a more positive note, they are considered empowering. They give you an opportunity to express yourself and to show pride in your appearance. They can boost your confidence, but then you should guard against becoming dependent on the opinions of others. It also allows you to control your image. (TeenVougue)

Why selfies are like writing memoirs

— 1 week ago with 33 notes
#Writing  #Mia Botha  #Writers Write  #Memoirs 
A Fabulous Resource for Writers - 350 Character Traits →

Even if you adore your protagonist and loathe your antagonist, it is important to remember that nobody is perfectly good, or perfectly evil. Every character will have positive and negative personality traits. Make sure you have created real people rather than caricatures by giving your cast a selection of both.

I have compiled these lists to help you select the traits you need. Have fun, and happy writing.
A bumper list of character traits for writers.
— 1 week ago with 329 notes
#350 Character Traits  #Writing Tips  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
Happy Birthday, Jess Walter, born 20 July 1965
Nine Quotes
When I’m deep in a novel, I don’t pay bills and I walk around in one shoe, drinking two-day old coffee, and calling my kids by the wrong names.
Without sounding overly sentimental about the process, I’d say trying to describe how you tend to conceive of a book is like describing how you tend to fall in love.
My desk is an antique with bookshelves built into the side. I’ve turned the drawer over to hold a keyboard. We live in a 100-year-old house, and I work in an apartment above the carriage house.
I pretty much drink a cup of coffee, write in my journal for a while, and then sit at a computer in my office and torture the keys. My one saving grace as a writer is that, if I’m having trouble with the novel I’m writing, I write something else, a poem or a short story. I try to avoid writer’s block by always writing something.
For me, movies and television are interesting because they are the dominant storytelling form of our time. My first love will always be fiction, and especially novels, but I’m a writer… I write poetry and essays and criticism and I’d love to write a whole play, and sometimes I even write scripts.
I think suspense should be like any other colour on a writer’s palette. I suppose I’m in the minority but I think it’s crazy for ‘literary fiction’ to divorce itself from stories that are suspenseful, and assign anything with cops or spies or criminals to some genre ghetto.
Forget being ‘discovered.’ All you can do is write. If you write well enough, and are stubborn enough to embrace failure, and if you happen to fall into the narrow categories that the book market recognizes, then you might make a little money. Otherwise, it’s a struggle. A gorgeous struggle.
Stories are people. I’m a story, you’re a story…your father is a story. Our stories go in every direction, but sometimes, if we’re lucky, our stories join into one, and for awhile, we’re less alone.
I think some people wait forever, and only at the end of their lives do they realize that their life has happened while they were waiting for it to start. 
Walter is an American author. He has written six novels and a collection of short stories. His has won many awards including the Edgar Allan Poe Award. Walter also writes screenplays and was the co-author of Christopher Darden’s 1996 best-seller In Contempt. 
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Jess Walter, born 20 July 1965

Nine Quotes

  1. When I’m deep in a novel, I don’t pay bills and I walk around in one shoe, drinking two-day old coffee, and calling my kids by the wrong names.
  2. Without sounding overly sentimental about the process, I’d say trying to describe how you tend to conceive of a book is like describing how you tend to fall in love.
  3. My desk is an antique with bookshelves built into the side. I’ve turned the drawer over to hold a keyboard. We live in a 100-year-old house, and I work in an apartment above the carriage house.
  4. I pretty much drink a cup of coffee, write in my journal for a while, and then sit at a computer in my office and torture the keys. My one saving grace as a writer is that, if I’m having trouble with the novel I’m writing, I write something else, a poem or a short story. I try to avoid writer’s block by always writing something.
  5. For me, movies and television are interesting because they are the dominant storytelling form of our time. My first love will always be fiction, and especially novels, but I’m a writer… I write poetry and essays and criticism and I’d love to write a whole play, and sometimes I even write scripts.
  6. I think suspense should be like any other colour on a writer’s palette. I suppose I’m in the minority but I think it’s crazy for ‘literary fiction’ to divorce itself from stories that are suspenseful, and assign anything with cops or spies or criminals to some genre ghetto.
  7. Forget being ‘discovered.’ All you can do is write. If you write well enough, and are stubborn enough to embrace failure, and if you happen to fall into the narrow categories that the book market recognizes, then you might make a little money. Otherwise, it’s a struggle. A gorgeous struggle.
  8. Stories are people. I’m a story, you’re a story…your father is a story. Our stories go in every direction, but sometimes, if we’re lucky, our stories join into one, and for awhile, we’re less alone.
  9. I think some people wait forever, and only at the end of their lives do they realize that their life has happened while they were waiting for it to start. 

Walter is an American author. He has written six novels and a collection of short stories. His has won many awards including the Edgar Allan Poe Award. Walter also writes screenplays and was the co-author of Christopher Darden’s 1996 best-seller In Contempt

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 58 notes
#Jess Walter  #Literary Birthday  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson 
Literary Birthday - 18 July
Happy Birthday, Margaret Laurence, born 18 July 1926, died 5 January 1987
FIve Quotes
When I say ‘work’ I only mean writing. Everything else is just odd jobs.
This is part of what writers do. They speak for people who cannot speak for themselves.
People have been saying the novel is dead for a long, long time. As far as I’m concerned, it’s still extremely alive. It simply finds new forms. 
I hope that a sense of love does come across. If it does, it’s because what I feel most of all when I’m writing my books is that each individual human being has great value. Each person is unique and irreplaceable. They matter. Of course, that is a very Western world outlook. But it’s profoundly my own
In a sense writing a novel is a sort of discovery. You know more or less where you’re headed but everything could change in the doing of it. And, you know, you can be very surprised. 
Laurence was a Canadian novelist and short story writer.  She is also a founder of the Writers’ Trust of Canada.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 18 July

Happy Birthday, Margaret Laurence, born 18 July 1926, died 5 January 1987

FIve Quotes

  1. When I say ‘work’ I only mean writing. Everything else is just odd jobs.
  2. This is part of what writers do. They speak for people who cannot speak for themselves.
  3. People have been saying the novel is dead for a long, long time. As far as I’m concerned, it’s still extremely alive. It simply finds new forms. 
  4. I hope that a sense of love does come across. If it does, it’s because what I feel most of all when I’m writing my books is that each individual human being has great value. Each person is unique and irreplaceable. They matter. Of course, that is a very Western world outlook. But it’s profoundly my own
  5. In a sense writing a novel is a sort of discovery. You know more or less where you’re headed but everything could change in the doing of it. And, you know, you can be very surprised. 

Laurence was a Canadian novelist and short story writer.  She is also a founder of the Writers’ Trust of Canada.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 37 notes
#margaret laurence  #lit  #literary birthday  #amanda patterson  #writers write 
The Inconsolable Writer - From Distraction to Inspiration in Four Easy Steps →

As creative people, we seek out perfection—a story we want to tell, a sculpture we want to fashion, a photograph we want to take. Tennessee Williams called it inconsolability. That’s a word I like. 

We are restless, itchy, even a bit frustrated at times. It’s the stone in a shoe. The grain of sand that makes a pearl. This is often how a good story, film, or piece of music is formed. 

How can getting distracted help you?

— 1 week ago with 47 notes
#The Inconsolable Writer - From Distraction to Inspiration in Four Easy Steps  #Anthony Ehlers  #Writing Advice  #Lit  #Writers Write 
Is it important to have an author platform? →

Any author needs to have an author platform. It generates sales, it creates awareness, and it builds relationships for future sales. It also gives you credibility and establishes you as a serious writer. 

It is not only for authors who wish to self-publish. Authors who publish traditionally are also required to have an online presence. Social media interaction and blogging are large parts of the publicity strategy for the publisher. eBooks and eReaders have played a huge role in this. 

For any aspiring author it is something you need to establish as soon as possible. Your online presence is where you will direct publishers in your query letters and how you will reach readers if you wish to self-publish. Basically you want to build your following before you publish.

How do you start?

— 2 weeks ago with 47 notes
#Is it important to have an author platform?  #Mia Botha  #Writers Write  #Writing Advice 
How to write an irresistible book blurb in five easy steps →

Your blurb will be an important part of your marketing. It is vital to get a reader’s attention. To write a good blurb, you have to make it short. Cut out sub-plots. Add tension to make it dramatic. Try not to mention more than two character’s names, and promise your audience a read they won’t forget.

I’ve come up with this easy acronym to help you create a blurb. I call it SCOPE. Follow these five steps and see if it works for you.

Setting
Conflict
Objective
Possible Solution
Emotional Promise

  1. Setting: All stories involve characters who are in a certain setting at a certain time. 
  2. Conflict: A good story places these characters in a situation where they have to act or react. A good way to start this part of your blurb is with the words: But, However, Until
  3. Objective: What do your characters need to do?
  4. Possible Solution: Offer the reader hope here. Show them how the protagonist can overcome. Give them a reason to pick up the book. Use the word ‘If’ here.
  5. Emotional Promise: Tell them how the book will make them feel. This sets the mood for your reader.

I saw The Edge of Tomorrow today, and I decided to write a blurb using this formula.

Example

  1. London. The near future. Aliens have invaded Earth and colonised Europe. Major William Cage is a PR expert for the US Army, which is working with the British to prevent the invaders from crossing the English Channel. Battle after battle is lost until an unexpected victory gives humanity hope.
  2. But the enemy is invincible. A planned push into Europe fails and Cage finds himself in a war he has no way to fight, and he is killed. However, he wakes up, rebooted back a day every time he dies.
  3. He lives through hellish day after day, until he finds another soldier, Sergeant Rita Vrataski, who understands what he can do to fight the enemy. Cage and Vrataski have to take the fight to the aliens, learning more after each repeated encounter.
  4. If they succeed, they will destroy the enemy, and save Earth.
  5. This thrilling action-packed science fiction war story will show you how heroes are made and wars can be won. Against the odds.

SCOPE will work for any blurb. Why don’t you try it?

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

© Amanda Patterson

If you enjoyed this article, you may enjoy How to write a query letter in 12 easy steps and How to write a one-page synopsis

— 2 weeks ago with 1631 notes
#How to write an irresistible book blurb in five easy steps  #writing tips  #writing advice  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
Happy Birthday, Jacques Derrida, born 15 July 1930, died 9 October 2004
Seven Quotes
I believe in the value of the book, which keeps something irreplaceable, and in the necessity of fighting to secure its respect.
No one gets angry at a mathematician or a physicist whom he or she doesn’t understand, or at someone who speaks a foreign language, but rather at someone who tampers with your own language.
What cannot be said above all must not be silenced but written.
But psychoanalysis has taught that the dead—a dead parent, for example—can be more alive for us, more powerful, more scary, than the living. It is the question of ghosts.
I always dream of a pen that would be a syringe.
The traditional statement about language is that it is in itself living, and that writing is the dead part of language.
Learning to live ought to mean learning to die - to acknowledge, to accept, an absolute mortality - without positive outcome, or resurrection, or redemption, for oneself or for anyone else. That has been the old philosophical injunction since Plato: to be a philosopher is to learn how to die.
Derrida was a French philosopher who published more than 40 books, as well as hundreds of essays. He is best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction. He is one of the major figures associated with post-modern philosophy.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Jacques Derrida, born 15 July 1930, died 9 October 2004

Seven Quotes

  1. I believe in the value of the book, which keeps something irreplaceable, and in the necessity of fighting to secure its respect.
  2. No one gets angry at a mathematician or a physicist whom he or she doesn’t understand, or at someone who speaks a foreign language, but rather at someone who tampers with your own language.
  3. What cannot be said above all must not be silenced but written.
  4. But psychoanalysis has taught that the dead—a dead parent, for example—can be more alive for us, more powerful, more scary, than the living. It is the question of ghosts.
  5. I always dream of a pen that would be a syringe.
  6. The traditional statement about language is that it is in itself living, and that writing is the dead part of language.
  7. Learning to live ought to mean learning to die - to acknowledge, to accept, an absolute mortality - without positive outcome, or resurrection, or redemption, for oneself or for anyone else. That has been the old philosophical injunction since Plato: to be a philosopher is to learn how to die.

Derrida was a French philosopher who published more than 40 books, as well as hundreds of essays. He is best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction. He is one of the major figures associated with post-modern philosophy.

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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 2 weeks ago with 63 notes
#Jacques Derrida  #Literary Birthday  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson 
The Writers Write Interview - Lauren Beukes
Lauren was in Johannesburg to promote her latest novel, Broken Monsters. She was charming and irreverent. She believes we should be promiscuous in our reading and try different genres and authors. One of her latest favourite finds has been Jennifer Egan. Her down-to-earth writing advice also inspired us. As she says, ‘There’s no such thing as writer’s block. There is such a thing as a big lump of fear and procrastination and the way to get through it is to chip away at it. Or sneak around it when the block’s not looking.’
Read the interview here

The Writers Write Interview - Lauren Beukes

Lauren was in Johannesburg to promote her latest novel, Broken Monsters. She was charming and irreverent. She believes we should be promiscuous in our reading and try different genres and authors. One of her latest favourite finds has been Jennifer Egan. Her down-to-earth writing advice also inspired us. As she says, ‘There’s no such thing as writer’s block. There is such a thing as a big lump of fear and procrastination and the way to get through it is to chip away at it. Or sneak around it when the block’s not looking.’

Read the interview here

— 2 weeks ago with 35 notes
#Lauren Beukes  #Writers Write  #Lauren Beukes Interview  #Amanda Patterson  #Broken Monsters