Showing posts tagged Writers Write.
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I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

17 Ways To Make your Novel More Memorable →

There are always ways to make your novel more memorable.

Here are 17 tips for writers who want to do just that.

I hope these tips help - whether you’re starting a novel, stuck in the middle, or finishing one. I wish you hours of Happy Writing.

— 4 days ago with 123 notes
#17 Ways To Make your Novel More Memorable  #Writing Advice  #Writing Tips  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
Five 10-Minute Fixes for Your Short Story →

"Maybe you’ve written a draft of a short story for an upcoming competition and it requires an emergency edit. Perhaps you’ve dusted off a story that has been languishing in a drawer and feel it needs some spark.”

Here are five 10-minute edits for your short story to get you to the deadline.

— 5 days ago with 64 notes
#Five 10-Minute Fixes for Your Short Story  #Anthony Ehlers  #Writers Write  #Short Stories 
The Writers Write Interview - Jassy MacKenzie →
Jassy Mackenzie is a South African author who has written seven novels. She lives in Johannesburg with her partner, Deon, two horses and two cats. She writes crime and erotica and still wrestles a day job. She is witty and kind and has trouble saying no to carrot cake. 
She says it’s funny that when she wrote crime no one ever asked if she had killed someone, but now that she writes erotica everyone asks about her sex life. She explains how she did her research, “I find lots of information on the internet. I read a book written by a mistress, which was very educational. I did have a similar background to Emma Caine, the protagonist in Folly.” 
About her latest book, Breathless: “All of us have been involved with abuse in different forms. I wanted to show how easy it is to be manipulated into believing it was your fault. I wanted to show a toxic relationship.”
Read the rest here: The Writers Write Interview with Jassy MacKenzie
— 6 days ago with 9 notes
#The Writers Write Interview - Jassy MacKenzie  #Writers Write  #Jassy Mackenzie  #South Africa 
Transitional Words and Phrases - Three reasons to use them →

What are transitional words or phrases?

Transitions are phrases or words that are used to connect one idea to the next.

Why do we need transition words?

  1. They provide coherence to a story.
  2. They help writers bridge the gap between ideas.
  3. They provide a signal to the reader about what is coming next in the writing.

The chart in the post has a variety of transitional words and phrases, and it shows us how we should use them.

— 6 days ago with 69 notes
#Transitional Words and Phrases - Three reasons to use them  #Grammar  #Education  #Writing Advice  #Writers Write 
A South African Publisher Wants Your Book! →

Shuter & Shooter Publishers have announced a new and exciting project that needs many books to be authored.

The project will include the Primary School Grades 1–7, in seven languages, namely isiZulu, isiXhosa, English, Sesotho, Sepedi, Afrikaans and Setswana.

The publishers need a set number of books written in the following genres:

  1. Poetry/rhyme
  2. Folktales/fables
  3. Short Stories
  4. Plays/drama
  5. Picture books/comics
  6. Storybooks/novels

Read more here.

— 1 week ago with 28 notes
#A South African Publisher Wants Your Book!  #Publishing  #Writers Write  #South Africa 
The Top 10 Writing Posts for September 2014 →

These were the Writers Write posts you enjoyed most in September 2014.

  1. Do you enjoy writing short stories? 10 Short Story Competitions To Enter Before The End Of 2014
  2. Grey Expectations - How ‘50 Shades of Grey’ has affected publishing
  3. Banned Books Week  - The 10 most challenged titles of 2013
  4. Which authors earned the most money last year? Forbes - 17 Top-Earning Authors 2014
  5. Making a stand - Three simple ways to get your hero to make a stand
  6. Business Writing - Oh no! Not again - Three questions you do not want to answer with a yes
  7. The characters they are a changin’ - How to use physical changes to reflect emotional growth
  8. How to stick to deadlines - Five Lifelines for Writers with Deadlines
  9. Dire Consequences - How to get your characters into trouble
  10. Looking for help with publishing? Five golden rules for submitting your work to agents or publishers
Previous Posts
— 1 week ago with 112 notes
#The Top 10 Writing Posts for September 2014  #Writers Write  #Writing Advice  #literary Trivia 
Writing for Young Adults - A Cheat Sheet →

Do you want to write for children or young adults or children? Yesterday, we posted an inspiring article, Six ways to find the children’s story only you can tell, to help you find your perfect story.

Today, we’ve added these cheat sheets.

— 1 week ago with 72 notes
#Writing for Young Adults - A Cheat Sheet  #Writers Write 
Happy Birthday, James Clavell, born 10 October 1924, died 6 September 1994.
Five Quotes
All stories have a beginning, a middle and an ending, and if they’re any good, the ending is a beginning.
Wars are fought by teenagers, you realize that. They really ought to be fought by the politicians and old people who start these wars.
Changi became my university instead of my prison. … Among the inmates there were experts in all walks of life — the high and the low roads. I studied and absorbed everything I could from physics to counterfeiting, but most of all I learned the art of surviving.
God gives us intelligence to uncover the wonders of nature. Without the gift, nothing is possible.
…the goal of writing any book is to create the illusion that what you are reading is reality and you’re part of it.
Clavell was an Australian-born British novelist, screenwriter, director and World War II veteran and prisoner of war. He is best known for his epic Asian Saga series of novels, which included King Rat, Tai-Pan and Shogun, and their televised adaptations, along with such films as The Great Escape and To Sir, with Love.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, James Clavell, born 10 October 1924, died 6 September 1994.

Five Quotes

  1. All stories have a beginning, a middle and an ending, and if they’re any good, the ending is a beginning.
  2. Wars are fought by teenagers, you realize that. They really ought to be fought by the politicians and old people who start these wars.
  3. Changi became my university instead of my prison. … Among the inmates there were experts in all walks of life — the high and the low roads. I studied and absorbed everything I could from physics to counterfeiting, but most of all I learned the art of surviving.
  4. God gives us intelligence to uncover the wonders of nature. Without the gift, nothing is possible.
  5. the goal of writing any book is to create the illusion that what you are reading is reality and you’re part of it.

Clavell was an Australian-born British novelist, screenwriter, director and World War II veteran and prisoner of war. He is best known for his epic Asian Saga series of novels, which included King Rat, Tai-Pan and Shogun, and their televised adaptations, along with such films as The Great Escape and To Sir, with Love.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 34 notes
#James Clavell  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson  #Literary Birthday 
Six ways to find the children's story only you can tell →

Write what you love to read – this is never truer than when it comes to children’s fiction.

When writing for children, it’s a good idea to think back to what excited you about books when you were growing up. Of course, it’s important to know what each age group, genre or publisher in the market is looking for – but to tap into the emotions and expectations of a young audience, you must try to remember what made you fall in love with books.

Do you remember the excitement of discovering the perfect book?

Six ways to find your children’s story

— 1 week ago with 45 notes
#Six ways to find the children's story only you can tell  #Writing Advice  #Writing for Children  #Anthony Ehlers  #Writers Write 
Happy Birthday, Guillermo del Toro, born 9 October 1964
Five Quotes
The point of being over 40 is to fulfil the desires you’ve been harbouring since you were 7.
I think there is a very quiet power in things that are not on screen.
There is beautiful in the grotesque.
Genius is the true mystery, and at its edge—the abyss.
But I think we are seeing a resurgence of the graphic ghost story like The Others, Devil’s Backbone and The Sixth Sense. It is a return to more gothic atmospheric ghost storytelling.
Del Toro is a Mexican film director, screenwriter, producer, and novelist. Del Toro’s film credits include The Devil’s Backbone, Pan’s Labyrinth, and Pacific Rim. His novels include The Strain, The Night Eternal, The Fall, and The Monsters of Hellboy II.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, Guillermo del Toro, born 9 October 1964

Five Quotes

  1. The point of being over 40 is to fulfil the desires you’ve been harbouring since you were 7.
  2. I think there is a very quiet power in things that are not on screen.
  3. There is beautiful in the grotesque.
  4. Genius is the true mystery, and at its edge—the abyss.
  5. But I think we are seeing a resurgence of the graphic ghost story like The Others, Devil’s Backbone and The Sixth Sense. It is a return to more gothic atmospheric ghost storytelling.

Del Toro is a Mexican film director, screenwriter, producer, and novelist. Del Toro’s film credits include The Devil’s Backbone, Pan’s Labyrinth, and Pacific Rim. His novels include The Strain, The Night Eternal, The Fall, and The Monsters of Hellboy II.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 160 notes
#Guillermo del Toro  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
Decisions, decisions – Which short story competition will you enter? →

There are so many short story competitions that you can enter before the end of the year. I find that it can be overwhelming. If you need help, we have a Short Cuts - how to write a short story, course on 19 October 2014.

How do you choose the competition that works for you?

  1. Read the prompt or find out about the theme. Does it seem like something you can, or want, to attempt?
  2. Pick the competition that suits your writing style. If you do better with stories that are 5 000 words in length rather than 2 000 words opt for the competition with the longer word count or visa versa.
  3. Ignore the prize money. Some competitions have excellent prizes, but don’t force your story to become something it is not, simply to be eligible. 
  4. Don’t try to enter them all. Less entries, mean better writing, better proofreading and better editing from you.
  5. Forget about winning and ignore everything I just said. It is a short story. Take a chance. Write in a new genre, try a different viewpoint. Rattle your own cage. Who knows where it will lead.

Short story competitions are unpredictable. Don’t take the results too seriously. They are great to enter and they give you a deadline. Try to have fun and write your heart out. Maybe you’ll win, maybe you won’t. It will be a great experience either way.

Decide on the story you want to enter here: 10 Short Story Competitions To Enter Before The End Of 2014

by Mia Botha for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 61 notes
#Mia Botha  #Which short story competition will you enter?  #Short Stories  #Writers Write  #Writing Advice 
Happy Birthday, R.L. Stine, born 8 October 1943
10 Quotes
I’ve had a very sheltered life. What can happen to you if you stay home writing all day?
The original Pinocchio is terrifying … He goes to sleep with his feet on the stove and burns his feet off!
Read. Read. Read. Just don’t read one type of book. Read different books by various authors so that you develop different styles.
If you do enough planning before you start to write, there’s no way you can have writer’s block. I do a complete chapter by chapter outline.
Kids think you just sit down and start writing. I always tell them you never do that.
I have a cheat-sheet for each one of my characters about their personality, the way they look, etc. 
People always ask, ‘How do you write so many books?’ And I say, I work a lot. I work six or seven days a week.
I read everywhere. I read every day. I read on the couch with my dog in the afternoon and at night. I try to read at least two to three hours a day. I read only fiction.
I used to get a haircut every Saturday so I would never miss any of the comic books. I had practically no hair when I was a kid!
When I was 13, for my bar mitzvah I received my first typewriter. And that was special.
Stine is an American writer, who is sometimes called the Stephen King of children’s literature. His hundreds of horror fiction novels include the Goosebumps series. R. L. Stine’s books have sold over 400 million copies.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson  for Writers Write

Happy Birthday, R.L. Stine, born 8 October 1943

10 Quotes

  1. I’ve had a very sheltered life. What can happen to you if you stay home writing all day?
  2. The original Pinocchio is terrifying … He goes to sleep with his feet on the stove and burns his feet off!
  3. Read. Read. Read. Just don’t read one type of book. Read different books by various authors so that you develop different styles.
  4. If you do enough planning before you start to write, there’s no way you can have writer’s block. I do a complete chapter by chapter outline.
  5. Kids think you just sit down and start writing. I always tell them you never do that.
  6. I have a cheat-sheet for each one of my characters about their personality, the way they look, etc. 
  7. People always ask, ‘How do you write so many books?’ And I say, I work a lot. I work six or seven days a week.
  8. I read everywhere. I read every day. I read on the couch with my dog in the afternoon and at night. I try to read at least two to three hours a day. I read only fiction.
  9. I used to get a haircut every Saturday so I would never miss any of the comic books. I had practically no hair when I was a kid!
  10. When I was 13, for my bar mitzvah I received my first typewriter. And that was special.

Stine is an American writer, who is sometimes called the Stephen King of children’s literature. His hundreds of horror fiction novels include the Goosebumps series. R. L. Stine’s books have sold over 400 million copies.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson  for Writers Write

— 1 week ago with 252 notes
#R.L. Stine  #Literary Birthday  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write  #Lit  #Goosebumps 
Why Punctuation Matters in Love and Legalese →

Are you writing a love letter or threatening to get a restraining order? How can one comma cost one million dollars?

It’s all in the punctuation.

— 1 week ago with 36 notes
#Punctuation  #Writing Advice  #Grammar  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson 
Short Stories -What makes a great short story? →

Some of the finest pieces of fiction are short stories. Reading a short story does not take much time, but you may remember it forever. Some of Stephen King and Roald Dahl’s best work is short fiction. My favourite short story is Roald Dahl’s Lamb to the Slaughter.

Because they are short, with a simple dramatic structure, short stories are easily adapted for film. In fact, Stephen King’s Rita Hayworth and The Shawshank Redemption became The Shawshank Redemption starring Morgan Freeman.

But what is a short story?

— 2 weeks ago with 86 notes
#Short Stories -What makes a great short story?  #Writing Advice  #Amanda Patterson  #writers write