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10 YA Novel to Film Adaptations That Kept Their Edgeby Molly Horan
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen ChboskyPerhaps it’s because the film was both written and directed by Chbosky himself, but it sticks pretty close to the book, and the result is a labor of love that doesn’t shy away from the realities — sexuality, drugs, unrequited longing, mixtapes — of being a teenager. Maybe it’s because we’re older now, but we almost found watching the story unfold on the big screen a more intense and upsetting experience than reading the book — in a good way. In fact, it was originally given an R rating and had to appeal the verdict to secure a more teen-friendly PG-13.
The Outsiders by S.E. HintonSome would debate how much edge S.E. Hinton’s classic novel had to begin with. Yes, it features a fatal stabbing, a large-scale gang fight, and the general feeling that its young characters could break out a weapon at any time, but it also has a protagonist reciting poetry and holding a Gone with the Wind story time. Still, by the end of the film, three teens have met violent ends, a pretty high body count for teen flick outside of the slasher section.
Speak by Laurie Halse AndersonThis made-for-TV movie didn’t shy away from the subject that made Laurie Halse Anderson’s novel so powerful; not only is its fourteen-year-old protagonist raped at a house party, but after her shaky call to the cops brings out a swarm of police ready to bust the underage drinkers, she becomes completely ostracized by her former friends and new classmates. A pre-Twilight Kristen Stewart plays the part perfectly, capturing the pain, isolation, and confusion of a teen with a serious secret and no one to talk to.
It’s Kind of A Funny Story by Ned VizziniAny novel or movie that starts with a high schooler’s attempted suicide is bound to be dark, though the semi-autobiographical book by Ned Vizzini is more hopeful than you might expect. The film wraps up almost too neatly for all the issues it raises about mental illness, but like the book, it tempers its happy ending with the reminder that a stay in the psych ward didn’t erase the protagonist’s problems, just gave him the tools to deal with them.
The Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsWhile it could be said the quick shots purposefully kept the gore off-screen in the adaptation of the first book in Suzanne Collins trilogy, the audience was still made painfully aware that children were dying at the hands of children. Even more important to the film’s edge was its portrayal of Katniss, and the movie succeeded in keeping her an incredibly strong, stoic protagonist.
Rumble Fish by S.E. HintonAnother film based on a S.E. Hinton novel, this movie has much of the same violence tempered with poetic ideas, though this time the love of literature in a seemingly tough main character is replaced with a love and respect for animals. Like The Outsiders, the film ends on a slightly hopeful, yet bloody note.
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants I and II by Ann BrasharesThe Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants didn’t have much of an edge to begin with, but the kind of topics that could get it placed on the banned book table, like suicide and teen sex, remained intact in the film version. Its sequel stepped things up with a pregnancy scare and even more attention given to the suicide of one girl’s mother. While both films are essentially sleepover movies, they do a good job at handling the material they have.
Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist by David LeviathanThe 2008 adaptation of this novel, about two teens running around Manhattan and eventually falling for each other, didn’t shy away from anything showing teens drinking, having sex, and making all around poor decisions. Plus, maybe it’s just all the Kat Dennings, but this film definitely felt as cool as the book — we bought it hook, line and sinker.
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Parts I and II by J.K. RowlingWhile most critics say the Potter films started getting an edge with The Prisoner of Azkaban (and the advent of director Alfonso Cuarón instead of Chris Columbus), the series’ final two films truly amped up the dark mood, in keeping with the books. The adaptations made no attempt to gloss over the deaths the main characters witnessed or the weight of the responsibility they faced. They were so heavy at times that it was easy to forget you were watching teenagers.
Youth in Revolt by C.D. PayneIt’s hard to believe a film carried by Michael Cera could have much edge to speak of, but it turns out all it takes to turn Mr. Cera into an arsonist and ladies man is a pencil mustache. This movie was able to retain the book’s sweetness about first love without sacrificing its edgier content.
via Flavorwire

10 YA Novel to Film Adaptations That Kept Their Edge
by Molly Horan

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Perhaps it’s because the film was both written and directed by Chbosky himself, but it sticks pretty close to the book, and the result is a labor of love that doesn’t shy away from the realities — sexuality, drugs, unrequited longing, mixtapes — of being a teenager. Maybe it’s because we’re older now, but we almost found watching the story unfold on the big screen a more intense and upsetting experience than reading the book — in a good way. In fact, it was originally given an R rating and had to appeal the verdict to secure a more teen-friendly PG-13.

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Some would debate how much edge S.E. Hinton’s classic novel had to begin with. Yes, it features a fatal stabbing, a large-scale gang fight, and the general feeling that its young characters could break out a weapon at any time, but it also has a protagonist reciting poetry and holding a Gone with the Wind story time. Still, by the end of the film, three teens have met violent ends, a pretty high body count for teen flick outside of the slasher section.

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
This made-for-TV movie didn’t shy away from the subject that made Laurie Halse Anderson’s novel so powerful; not only is its fourteen-year-old protagonist raped at a house party, but after her shaky call to the cops brings out a swarm of police ready to bust the underage drinkers, she becomes completely ostracized by her former friends and new classmates. A pre-Twilight Kristen Stewart plays the part perfectly, capturing the pain, isolation, and confusion of a teen with a serious secret and no one to talk to.

It’s Kind of A Funny Story by Ned Vizzini
Any novel or movie that starts with a high schooler’s attempted suicide is bound to be dark, though the semi-autobiographical book by Ned Vizzini is more hopeful than you might expect. The film wraps up almost too neatly for all the issues it raises about mental illness, but like the book, it tempers its happy ending with the reminder that a stay in the psych ward didn’t erase the protagonist’s problems, just gave him the tools to deal with them.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
While it could be said the quick shots purposefully kept the gore off-screen in the adaptation of the first book in Suzanne Collins trilogy, the audience was still made painfully aware that children were dying at the hands of children. Even more important to the film’s edge was its portrayal of Katniss, and the movie succeeded in keeping her an incredibly strong, stoic protagonist.

Rumble Fish by S.E. Hinton
Another film based on a S.E. Hinton novel, this movie has much of the same violence tempered with poetic ideas, though this time the love of literature in a seemingly tough main character is replaced with a love and respect for animals. Like The Outsiders, the film ends on a slightly hopeful, yet bloody note.

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants I and II by Ann Brashares
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants didn’t have much of an edge to begin with, but the kind of topics that could get it placed on the banned book table, like suicide and teen sex, remained intact in the film version. Its sequel stepped things up with a pregnancy scare and even more attention given to the suicide of one girl’s mother. While both films are essentially sleepover movies, they do a good job at handling the material they have.

Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist by David Leviathan
The 2008 adaptation of this novel, about two teens running around Manhattan and eventually falling for each other, didn’t shy away from anything showing teens drinking, having sex, and making all around poor decisions. Plus, maybe it’s just all the Kat Dennings, but this film definitely felt as cool as the book — we bought it hook, line and sinker.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Parts I and II by J.K. Rowling
While most critics say the Potter films started getting an edge with The Prisoner of Azkaban (and the advent of director Alfonso Cuarón instead of Chris Columbus), the series’ final two films truly amped up the dark mood, in keeping with the books. The adaptations made no attempt to gloss over the deaths the main characters witnessed or the weight of the responsibility they faced. They were so heavy at times that it was easy to forget you were watching teenagers.

Youth in Revolt by C.D. Payne
It’s hard to believe a film carried by Michael Cera could have much edge to speak of, but it turns out all it takes to turn Mr. Cera into an arsonist and ladies man is a pencil mustache. This movie was able to retain the book’s sweetness about first love without sacrificing its edgier content.

via Flavorwire

— 2 years ago with 43 notes
#YA  #Films  #Novels  #Lit  #Adaptations 
What Your Favorite YA Series Says About You
Harry Potter, J.K. RowlingYou spent several of your formative years wishing you could be way cooler than you really were. But then again, who didn’t?The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas AdamsYou haven’t been to Comic Con, but you desperately want to go. Also, you may or may not have too many towels in your house.The Mortal Instruments, Cassandra ClareBuffy the Vampire Slayer is still your favorite TV show. No, wait, make that Angel.Discworld (Tiffany Aching books), Terry PratchettYou tend to question your own assumptions and those of others. The side effect of this is that you spend a good deal of time wondering if the world will collapse when an elephant sneezes.The Princess Diaries, Meg CabotYou’ve got muddy sneakers on under that party dress.The Hunger Games, Suzanne CollinsYou really, really think you would win in a fight to the death with 23 other people. You wouldn’t, though.Anne of Green Gables, L.M. MontgomeryYou bake pies and knit and are probably a really lovely person.The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, Ann BrasharesYou just can’t give up wearing favorite item of clothing from when you were a teenager, regardless of the fact that it’s stained and ragged and looks terrible on you now. Your friends are no help in this matter.The Dark Is Rising Sequence, Susan CooperYou wish you had more uncles. And brothers, for that matter.Dangerous Angels: The Weetzie Bat Books, Francesca Lia BlockYou were a pretty weird teenager, and you’ve grown up to be a pretty weird adult. But you’re pretty happy with that (as you should be).The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien You very much enjoy taking long road trips with your ragtag group of friends.The Twilight Saga, Stephenie MeyerSometimes, you want things you can’t have SO BADLY, you guys. We know, it hurts.The Earthsea Cycle, Ursula K. LeGuinYou irritate all your friends by constantly asking them to tell you their “true” names. Some of them are just named “Ralph,” okay?Vampire Academy, Richelle MeadYou’re really, really protective of your best friend. Like seriously, back off.Confessions of Georgia Nicolson, Louise RennisonYou may or may not be a complete Anglophile, but you definitely know what it feels like to be knocked out by your nunga-nungas. Metaphorically, of course.The Giver Series, Lois LowryYou never wear black and you love to tell stories.The Uglies, Scott WesterfieldYou were pretty disappointed that you didn’t automatically turn into a supermodel when you hit sixteen, but you’ve learned to live with it.The Enchanted Forest Chronicles, Patricia C. WredeYou’re a smart aleck and kind of a badass — that is, you know all the places where a young lady is supposed to scream for help, but you generally prefer to rely on your sword hand. Also you make a killer cherries jubilee.The Hush, Hush Saga, Becca FitzpatrickYou assume that any bad boy is really a fallen angel — but you don’t necessarily think they can be saved.The Bartimaeus Trilogy, Jonathan StroudYou can never quite tell if your best friend is evil or not, but you’ve decided that it doesn’t much matter. He’s probably thinking the same thing about you.His Dark Materials, Philip PullmanYou’re pretty much the only person in your family who isn’t mortally terrified of their own self-awareness. Good for you.Divergent, Veronica RothYou spend a lot of time thinking about which of your own attributes you like the best.Alphas, Lisi HarrisonYou kind of wish you could roll America’s Next Top Model, Project Runway, and American Idol into one show, and then live in it.Delirium, Lauren OliverYou’re into taking calculated risks with very serious diseases. We advise caution with that love sickness.The Time Quintet, Madeleine L’EngleYou are an epic nerd, but that’s how you’re going to save the world.Pretty Little Liars, Sara ShepardYour hair is full of secrets.The Abhorsen Trilogy, Garth NixPeople think it’s weird that your pets are your best friends, but you know better.Gossip Girl, Cecily Von ZeigesarYou’ve probably never been to New York City.The Chronicles of Chrestomanci, Diana Wynne JonesYou always seem to land on your feet.
by Emily Temple, Flavorwire

What Your Favorite YA Series Says About You

Harry Potter, J.K. Rowling
You spent several of your formative years wishing you could be way cooler than you really were. But then again, who didn’t?

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
You haven’t been to Comic Con, but you desperately want to go. Also, you may or may not have too many towels in your house.

The Mortal Instruments, Cassandra Clare
Buffy the Vampire Slayer is still your favorite TV show. No, wait, make that Angel.

Discworld (Tiffany Aching books), Terry Pratchett
You tend to question your own assumptions and those of others. The side effect of this is that you spend a good deal of time wondering if the world will collapse when an elephant sneezes.

The Princess Diaries, Meg Cabot
You’ve got muddy sneakers on under that party dress.

The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins
You really, really think you would win in a fight to the death with 23 other people. You wouldn’t, though.

Anne of Green Gables, L.M. Montgomery
You bake pies and knit and are probably a really lovely person.

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, Ann Brashares
You just can’t give up wearing favorite item of clothing from when you were a teenager, regardless of the fact that it’s stained and ragged and looks terrible on you now. Your friends are no help in this matter.

The Dark Is Rising Sequence, Susan Cooper
You wish you had more uncles. And brothers, for that matter.

Dangerous Angels: The Weetzie Bat Books, Francesca Lia Block
You were a pretty weird teenager, and you’ve grown up to be a pretty weird adult. But you’re pretty happy with that (as you should be).

The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien 
You very much enjoy taking long road trips with your ragtag group of friends.

The Twilight Saga, Stephenie Meyer
Sometimes, you want things you can’t have SO BADLY, you guys. We know, it hurts.

The Earthsea Cycle, Ursula K. LeGuin
You irritate all your friends by constantly asking them to tell you their “true” names. Some of them are just named “Ralph,” okay?

Vampire Academy, Richelle Mead
You’re really, really protective of your best friend. Like seriously, back off.

Confessions of Georgia Nicolson, Louise Rennison
You may or may not be a complete Anglophile, but you definitely know what it feels like to be knocked out by your nunga-nungas. Metaphorically, of course.

The Giver Series, Lois Lowry
You never wear black and you love to tell stories.

The Uglies, Scott Westerfield
You were pretty disappointed that you didn’t automatically turn into a supermodel when you hit sixteen, but you’ve learned to live with it.

The Enchanted Forest Chronicles, Patricia C. Wrede
You’re a smart aleck and kind of a badass — that is, you know all the places where a young lady is supposed to scream for help, but you generally prefer to rely on your sword hand. Also you make a killer cherries jubilee.

The Hush, Hush Saga, Becca Fitzpatrick
You assume that any bad boy is really a fallen angel — but you don’t necessarily think they can be saved.

The Bartimaeus Trilogy, Jonathan Stroud
You can never quite tell if your best friend is evil or not, but you’ve decided that it doesn’t much matter. He’s probably thinking the same thing about you.

His Dark Materials, Philip Pullman
You’re pretty much the only person in your family who isn’t mortally terrified of their own self-awareness. Good for you.

Divergent, Veronica Roth
You spend a lot of time thinking about which of your own attributes you like the best.

Alphas, Lisi Harrison
You kind of wish you could roll America’s Next Top Model, Project Runway, and American Idol into one show, and then live in it.

Delirium, Lauren Oliver
You’re into taking calculated risks with very serious diseases. We advise caution with that love sickness.

The Time Quintet, Madeleine L’Engle
You are an epic nerd, but that’s how you’re going to save the world.

Pretty Little Liars, Sara Shepard
Your hair is full of secrets.

The Abhorsen Trilogy, Garth Nix
People think it’s weird that your pets are your best friends, but you know better.

Gossip Girl, Cecily Von Zeigesar
You’ve probably never been to New York City.

The Chronicles of Chrestomanci, Diana Wynne Jones
You always seem to land on your feet.

by Emily Temple, Flavorwire

— 2 years ago with 135 notes
#YA  #books  #lit 
"As Jane Austen might have put it: It is a truth universally acknowledged that young protagonists in search of adventure must ditch their parents."
 Philip Pullman
— 2 years ago with 26 notes
#lit  #quotes  #YA 
Top 10 YA Books That Should Be Adapted for Film →
  1. 'Incarceron' by Catherine Fisher
  2. 'The Knife of Never Letting Go' by Patrick Ness
  3. 'Graceling' by Kristin Cashore
  4. 'Beauty Queens' by Libba Bray
  5. 'The Jessica Darling Series' by Megan McCafferty
  6. 'Daughter of Smoke and Bone' by Laini Taylor
  7. 'The Apothecary' by Maile Meloy
  8. 'Inside the Shadow City' by Kirsten Miller
  9. 'The Scorpio Races' by Maggie Stiefvater
  10. 'Divergent' by Veronica Roth
— 2 years ago with 19 notes
#YA  #fiction  #lit 
Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor (Hodder & Stoughton)

Amanda Patterson's review on Goodreads



Karou is the beautiful girl with the blue hair who doesn’t belong. She doesn’t know where she comes from and nobody will tell her. She lives in two worlds, ‘Elsewhere’ and Earth. She runs errands for Brimstone, who raised her, and lives as a 17-year-old art student in Prague for the rest.Enter Akiva, the angel who wants to kill her family. But he’s smitten as he observes, “It was like stepping into the pages of a book - a book alive with colour and fragrance, filth and chaos - and the blue-haired girl moved through it all like a fairy through a story, the light treating her differently than it did others, the air seeming to gather around her like held breath. As if this whole place were a story about her.”The doors to Elsewhere are closing. Karou has to find out who she is, and what her destiny is. The novel is beautifully written. Taylor weaves words with myths with dreams. However, I found she lost me in the last third of the book when things became too unbelievable. Even for this book.3.5/5
Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor (Hodder & Stoughton)

Amanda Patterson's review on Goodreads

Karou is the beautiful girl with the blue hair who doesn’t belong. She doesn’t know where she comes from and nobody will tell her. She lives in two worlds, ‘Elsewhere’ and Earth. She runs errands for Brimstone, who raised her, and lives as a 17-year-old art student in Prague for the rest.
Enter Akiva, the angel who wants to kill her family. But he’s smitten as he observes, “It was like stepping into the pages of a book - a book alive with colour and fragrance, filth and chaos - and the blue-haired girl moved through it all like a fairy through a story, the light treating her differently than it did others, the air seeming to gather around her like held breath. As if this whole place were a story about her.”
The doors to Elsewhere are closing. Karou has to find out who she is, and what her destiny is. The novel is beautifully written. Taylor weaves words with myths with dreams. However, I found she lost me in the last third of the book when things became too unbelievable. Even for this book.

3.5/5

— 2 years ago
#fantasy  #YA  #review  #fiction