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I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

Quotable - Thornton Wilder, born 17 April 1897, died 197510 Quotes http://bit.ly/1lahmDs

Quotable - Thornton Wilder, born 17 April 1897, died 1975
10 Quotes http://bit.ly/1lahmDs

— 21 hours ago with 56 notes
#Thornton Wilder  #Literary Birthday  #Quotes  #lit  #eavesdropping 
The Locked Room – A simple way to test your plot →

A trapped character comes alive on the page or screen because he has to fight his way out a corner. The character has to push back against the predicament placed there by the plot—giving us conflict, intensity, and barriers we can define. The locked room is a way to interrogate your plot. 

More about The Locked Room

— 22 hours ago with 73 notes
#The Locked Room  #Writing Advice  #Anthony Ehlers  #Lit  #Plotting  #Writers Write 
What your writing equipment says about you →

We spend our days clicking away on our laptops, desktops, tablets and phones. We write memos and type reminders and fill documents using things like auto correction and spell check. We race the cursor and watch as our word count climbs, but when the electricity is off and the batteries need charging, we reveal our inner writer.

When you have to write by hand, what do your chosen tools say about you? 

  1. Pencil: Pencils can be either dark (B’s) or light (H’s). Writers who prefer pencils tend to be commitment phobic and flit from project to project. The lighter the pencil, the more insecure the writer. The darker the pencil the less chance the person is actually a writer. They are most likely the talkers or visually impaired. Writers who use HB pencils should grow a pair and just commit to one of their projects. 
  2. Pen: Pens are divided by price and levels of self-censoring. The more expensive the pen the more repressed the writer and the more self-censoring occurs. The story is there, but because these writers refuse to be honest with themselves their writing remains flat. Writers who choose pens however, are tenacious and will never give up, regardless of a disastrous plot or blatant and repeated rejection. Writers who like pens that click have obsessive personalities and will spend time in rehab at some point in their careers. 

Subcategory of the pen - Ink colour

  • Blue: You still write like you did at school. Long-winded essays wrought with unspecified adjectives and lazy adverbs. 
  • Black: You steal pens and you might actually make it as a writer if only you could get out of your own way. 
  • Red: You have masochistic tendencies. 
  • Green: There is something wrong with you, but as long as no one else gets hurt we’ll leave you be. 
  • Any other colour: Seek professional help. Immediately. 

Erasers and sharpeners: 

  1. Writers who choose pencils with erasers attached to the end tend to be skittish, fragile creatures who kill ideas faster than they can create them. The ideas might be good, but we never know because the ideas are erased as fast they are written.
  2. If a writer prefers a large eraser with sharp corners they are most likely a dark pencil user and not really a writer.
  3. If you have a tiny piece of rubber that used to be a big fat eraser you might actually have the ability to become a writer. 
  4. The same can be said about having a desk-mounted pencil sharpener - this is how you know you are indeed a writer. Regardless of the type of pencil used, this is the mark of a true wordsmith.
  5. Small, handheld sharpeners can only be used in the direst of situations or out-of-office writing days and then only if they are embellished with some kind of animated character. 
  6. Writers who use Tippex are imposters and can’t write a word. Seriously, who waits for Tippex to dry?
  7. Lastly, if writers chew on their chosen implements, they are hungry and should be fed. 

If you have read through this entire post trying to find you ideal implement/corrector combo you have proved that you are indeed a writer and a master procrastinator. That said you should be writing and not reading posts about writing tools. Your implement does not dictate your writing fate. You do.

by Mia Botha for Writers Write

— 1 day ago with 121 notes
#What your writing equipment says about you  #Mia Botha  #Writers Write  #Writing Trivia  #Lit 
"The moon hung over the planet Earth, a dead thing over a dying thing."
John Fowles
— 3 days ago with 312 notes
#John Fowles  #lit  #quotes  #moon  #earth 
Literary Birthday - 13 April
Happy Birthday, Seamus Heaney, born 13 April 1939, died 30 August 2013
Five Quotes
I can’t think of a case where poems changed the world, but what they do is they change people’s understanding of what’s going on in the world.
Debate doesn’t really change things. It gets you bogged in deeper. If you can address or reopen the subject with something new, something from a different angle, then there is some hope…. That’s something poetry can do for you, it can entrance you for a moment above the pool of your own consciousness and your own possibilities.
If you have the words, there’s always a chance that you’ll find the way.
Poetry cannot afford to lose its fundamentally self-delighting inventiveness, its joy in being a process of language as well as a representation of things in the world.
I’ve always associated the moment of writing with a moment of lift, of joy, of unexpected reward.
Heaney was an Irish poet, playwright, translator, and lecturer. He won the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature. 
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 13 April

Happy Birthday, Seamus Heaney, born 13 April 1939, died 30 August 2013

Five Quotes

  1. I can’t think of a case where poems changed the world, but what they do is they change people’s understanding of what’s going on in the world.
  2. Debate doesn’t really change things. It gets you bogged in deeper. If you can address or reopen the subject with something new, something from a different angle, then there is some hope…. That’s something poetry can do for you, it can entrance you for a moment above the pool of your own consciousness and your own possibilities.
  3. If you have the words, there’s always a chance that you’ll find the way.
  4. Poetry cannot afford to lose its fundamentally self-delighting inventiveness, its joy in being a process of language as well as a representation of things in the world.
  5. I’ve always associated the moment of writing with a moment of lift, of joy, of unexpected reward.

Heaney was an Irish poet, playwright, translator, and lecturer. He won the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature. 

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 5 days ago with 181 notes
#Seamus Heaney  #Literary Birthday  #amanda patterson  #lit  #Writers Write 
"We are so lonely here, with only our loved ones for company. We kill, maim, insult our loved ones, or dream of doing so, to keep from going mad. And then disaster strikes. God, how we love disaster."
Jincy Willett
— 1 week ago with 83 notes
#Jincy Willett  #Lit  #Quotes 
"Happily ever after, or even just together ever after, is not cheesy,” Wren said. “It’s the noblest, like, the most courageous thing two people can shoot for."
Rainbow Rowell
— 1 week ago with 196 notes
#Rainbow Rowell  #Lit  #Quotes 
Quotable - Barbara Kingsolver, born 8 April 1955Nine Quotes http://bit.ly/1g09dkQ

Quotable - Barbara Kingsolver, born 8 April 1955
Nine Quotes http://bit.ly/1g09dkQ

— 1 week ago with 76 notes
#Barbara Kingsolver  #lit  #quotes 
"There is more to a boy than what his mother sees. There is more to a boy then what his father dreams. Inside every boy lies a heart that beats. And sometimes it screams, refusing to take defeat. And sometimes his father’s dreams aren’t big enough, and sometimes his mother’s vision isn’t long enough. And sometimes the boy has to dream his own dreams and break through the clouds with his own sunbeams."
Ben Behunin
— 1 week ago with 127 notes
#Ben Behunin  #Lit  #Quotes  #Mothers  #Fathers  #Sons 

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

— 1 week ago with 63582 notes
#Body Language  #Writing Tips  #Lit  #Amanda Patterson  #Writers Write 
"There are chapters in every life which are seldom read, and certainly not aloud."
Carol Shields
— 2 weeks ago with 473 notes
#Carol Shields  #Lit  #Quotes