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I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

"You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation."
Plato
— 7 months ago with 322 notes
#Plato  #quotes  #philosophy 
Literary Birthday - 5 May
Happy Birthday, Søren Kierkegaard, born 5 May 1813, died 11 November 1855
12 Philosophical Quotes
The most common form of despair is not being who you are.
People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.
What is a poet? An unhappy person who conceals profound anguish in his heart but whose lips are so formed that as sighs and cries pass over them they sound like beautiful music.
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn’t true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true.
I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations — one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it — you will regret both.
Listen to the cry of a woman in labour at the hour of giving birth — look at the dying man’s struggle at his last extremity, and then tell me whether something that begins and ends thus could be intended for enjoyment.
Instruction begins when you, the teacher, learn from the learner; put yourself in his place so that you may understand- what he learns and the way he understands it
My standpoint is armed neutrality.
Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.
A fire broke out backstage in a theatre. The clown came out to warn the public; they thought it was a joke and applauded. He repeated it; the acclaim was even greater. I think that’s just how the world will come to an end: to general applause from wits who believe it’s a joke.
The truth is a trap: you cannot get it without it getting you; you cannot get the truth by capturing it, only by its capturing you.
Boredom is the root of all evil - the despairing refusal to be oneself.
Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic, and religious author. He wrote critical texts on organized religion, Christendom, morality, ethics, psychology and philosophy of religion, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and parables. He is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 5 May

Happy Birthday, Søren Kierkegaard, born 5 May 1813, died 11 November 1855

12 Philosophical Quotes

  1. The most common form of despair is not being who you are.
  2. People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.
  3. What is a poet? An unhappy person who conceals profound anguish in his heart but whose lips are so formed that as sighs and cries pass over them they sound like beautiful music.
  4. There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn’t true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true.
  5. I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations — one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it — you will regret both.
  6. Listen to the cry of a woman in labour at the hour of giving birth — look at the dying man’s struggle at his last extremity, and then tell me whether something that begins and ends thus could be intended for enjoyment.
  7. Instruction begins when you, the teacher, learn from the learner; put yourself in his place so that you may understand- what he learns and the way he understands it
  8. My standpoint is armed neutrality.
  9. Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.
  10. A fire broke out backstage in a theatre. The clown came out to warn the public; they thought it was a joke and applauded. He repeated it; the acclaim was even greater. I think that’s just how the world will come to an end: to general applause from wits who believe it’s a joke.
  11. The truth is a trap: you cannot get it without it getting you; you cannot get the truth by capturing it, only by its capturing you.
  12. Boredom is the root of all evil - the despairing refusal to be oneself.

Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic, and religious author. He wrote critical texts on organized religion, Christendom, morality, ethics, psychology and philosophy of religion, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and parables. He is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 year ago with 210 notes
#Søren Kierkegaard  #Lit  #Literary Birthday  #Philosophy  #amanda patterson  #Writers Write 
Literary Birthday - 26 April
Happy Birthday, David Hume, born 26 April 1711, died 25 August 1776
The Top 10 Philosophical David Hume Quotes
Beauty is no quality in things themselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty.
But the life of a man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster.
Nothing is more surprising than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few.
That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise.
Art may make a suit of clothes; but nature must produce a man.
The corruption of the best things gives rise to the worst.
A wise man proportions his belief to the evidence.
I have written on all sorts of subjects… yet I have no enemies; except indeed all the Whigs, all the Tories, and all the Christians.
Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous.
Though there be no such thing as chance in the world; our ignorance of the real cause of any event has the same influence on the understanding, and begets a like species of belief or opinion.
David Hume is often called the most important philosopher ever to write in English. He was one of the last of the great triumvirate of ‘British empiricists’. Hume’s major philosophical works — A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-1740), the Enquiries concerning Human Understanding (1748) and concerning the Principles of Morals (1751), as well as the posthumously published Dialogues concerning Natural Religion (1779) — remain widely and deeply influential.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 26 April

Happy Birthday, David Hume, born 26 April 1711, died 25 August 1776

The Top 10 Philosophical David Hume Quotes

  1. Beauty is no quality in things themselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty.
  2. But the life of a man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster.
  3. Nothing is more surprising than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few.
  4. That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise.
  5. Art may make a suit of clothes; but nature must produce a man.
  6. The corruption of the best things gives rise to the worst.
  7. A wise man proportions his belief to the evidence.
  8. I have written on all sorts of subjects… yet I have no enemies; except indeed all the Whigs, all the Tories, and all the Christians.
  9. Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous.
  10. Though there be no such thing as chance in the world; our ignorance of the real cause of any event has the same influence on the understanding, and begets a like species of belief or opinion.

David Hume is often called the most important philosopher ever to write in English. He was one of the last of the great triumvirate of ‘British empiricists’. Hume’s major philosophical works — A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-1740), the Enquiries concerning Human Understanding (1748) and concerning the Principles of Morals (1751), as well as the posthumously published Dialogues concerning Natural Religion (1779) — remain widely and deeply influential.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 year ago with 51 notes
#David Hume  #Philosophy  #Literary Birthday  #Writers Write  #amanda patterson  #lit 
Literary Birthday - 1 April
Happy Birthday, Abraham Harold Maslow, born 1 April 1908, died 8 June 1970
Quotes
If you deliberately set out to be less than you are capable, you’ll be unhappy for the rest of your life.
It isn’t normal to know what we want. It is a rare and difficult psychological achievement.
A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself. What a man can be, he must be.
What is necessary to change a person is to change his awareness of himself.
Sometimes I think we’re alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we’re not. In either case the idea is quite staggering.
Maslow was an American psychologist who was best known for creating Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, a theory of psychological health predicated on fulfilling innate human needs in priority, culminating in self-actualisation. His works include Toward a Psychology of Being and Motivation and Personality.
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by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 1 April

Happy Birthday, Abraham Harold Maslow, born 1 April 1908, died 8 June 1970

Quotes

  1. If you deliberately set out to be less than you are capable, you’ll be unhappy for the rest of your life.
  2. It isn’t normal to know what we want. It is a rare and difficult psychological achievement.
  3. A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself. What a man can be, he must be.
  4. What is necessary to change a person is to change his awareness of himself.
  5. Sometimes I think we’re alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we’re not. In either case the idea is quite staggering.

Maslow was an American psychologist who was best known for creating Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, a theory of psychological health predicated on fulfilling innate human needs in priority, culminating in self-actualisation. His works include Toward a Psychology of Being and Motivation and Personality.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 year ago with 52 notes
#Abraham Harold Maslow  #Literary Birthday  #Writers Write  #Lit  #Psychology  #Philosophy  #Amanda Patterson 
Literary Birthday - 23 March
Happy Birthday, Erich Fromm, born 23 March 1900, died 18 March 1980
12 Erich Fromm Quotes
Nationalism is our form of incest, is our idolatry, is our insanity. ‘Patriotism’ is its cult. 
Creativity requires the courage to let go of certainties.
To die is poignantly bitter, but the idea of having to die without having lived is unbearable.
Immature love says: ‘I love you because I need you’. Mature love says ‘I need you because I love you’.
We all dream; we do not understand our dreams, yet we act as if nothing strange goes on in our sleep minds, strange at least by comparison with the logical, purposeful doings of our minds when we are awake.
Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence.
The only truly affluent are those who do not want more than they have.
There can be no real freedom without the freedom to fail.
The capacity to be puzzled is the premise of all creation, be it in art or in science.
That millions of people share the same forms of mental pathology does not make these people sane.
Paradoxically, the ability to be alone is the condition for the ability to love.
I am convinced that boredom is one of the greatest tortures. If I were to imagine Hell, it would be the place where you were continually bored.
Fromm was a German social psychologist, psychoanalyst, sociologist, and humanistic philosopher. His works include The Art of Loving; Love, Sexuality, and Matriarchy; and Man for Himself. He was associated with what became known as the Frankfurt School of critical theory.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Literary Birthday - 23 March

Happy Birthday, Erich Fromm, born 23 March 1900, died 18 March 1980

12 Erich Fromm Quotes

  1. Nationalism is our form of incest, is our idolatry, is our insanity. ‘Patriotism’ is its cult. 
  2. Creativity requires the courage to let go of certainties.
  3. To die is poignantly bitter, but the idea of having to die without having lived is unbearable.
  4. Immature love says: ‘I love you because I need you’. Mature love says ‘I need you because I love you’.
  5. We all dream; we do not understand our dreams, yet we act as if nothing strange goes on in our sleep minds, strange at least by comparison with the logical, purposeful doings of our minds when we are awake.
  6. Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence.
  7. The only truly affluent are those who do not want more than they have.
  8. There can be no real freedom without the freedom to fail.
  9. The capacity to be puzzled is the premise of all creation, be it in art or in science.
  10. That millions of people share the same forms of mental pathology does not make these people sane.
  11. Paradoxically, the ability to be alone is the condition for the ability to love.
  12. I am convinced that boredom is one of the greatest tortures. If I were to imagine Hell, it would be the place where you were continually bored.

Fromm was a German social psychologist, psychoanalyst, sociologist, and humanistic philosopher. His works include The Art of Loving; Love, Sexuality, and Matriarchy; and Man for HimselfHe was associated with what became known as the Frankfurt School of critical theory.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

— 1 year ago with 302 notes
#Erich Fromm  #Literary Birthday  #Writers Write  #Amanda Patterson  #Lit  #Philosophy 
Anton Chekhov’s Eight Criteria That Define Civilized People
'Civilized people must, I believe, satisfy the following criteria:
They respect human beings as individuals and are therefore always tolerant, gentle, courteous and amenable … They do not create scenes over a hammer or a mislaid eraser; they do not make you feel they are conferring a great benefit on you when they live with you, and they don’t make a scandal when they leave. (…)
They have compassion for other people besides beggars and cats. Their hearts suffer the pain of what is hidden to the naked eye. (…)
They respect other people’s property, and therefore pay their debts.
They are not devious, and they fear lies as they fear fire. They don’t tell lies even in the most trivial matters. To lie to someone is to insult them, and the liar is diminished in the eyes of the person he lies to. Civilized people don’t put on airs; they behave in the street as they would at home, they don’t show off to impress their juniors. (…)
They don’t run themselves down in order to provoke the sympathy of others. They don’t play on other people’s heartstrings to be sighed over and cosseted … that sort of thing is just cheap striving for effects, it’s vulgar, old hat and false. (…)
They are not vain. They don’t waste time with the fake jewellery of hobnobbing with celebrities, being permitted to shake the hand of a drunken [judicial orator], the exaggerated bonhomie of the first person they meet at the Salon, being the life and soul of the bar … They regard praises like ‘I am a representative of the Press!!’ — the sort of thing one only hears from [very minor journalists] — as absurd. If they have done a brass farthing’s work they don’t pass it off as if it were 100 roubles’ by swanking about with their portfolios, and they don’t boast of being able to gain admission to places other people aren’t allowed in (…) True talent always sits in the shade, mingles with the crowd, avoids the limelight … As Krylov said, the empty barrel makes more noise than the full one. (…)
If they do possess talent, they value it … They take pride in it … they know they have a responsibility to exert a civilizing influence on [others] rather than aimlessly hanging out with them. And they are fastidious in their habits. (…)
They work at developing their aesthetic sensibility … Civilized people don’t simply obey their baser instincts … they require mens sana in corpore sano.
And so on. That’s what civilized people are like … Reading Pickwick and learning a speech from Faust by heart is not enough if your aim is to become a truly civilized person and not to sink below the level of your surroundings.’
[From a letter to Nikolay Chekhov, March 1886]~ Anton Chekhov, A Life in Letters

Anton Chekhov’s Eight Criteria That Define Civilized People

'Civilized people must, I believe, satisfy the following criteria:

  1. They respect human beings as individuals and are therefore always tolerant, gentle, courteous and amenable … They do not create scenes over a hammer or a mislaid eraser; they do not make you feel they are conferring a great benefit on you when they live with you, and they don’t make a scandal when they leave. (…)
  2. They have compassion for other people besides beggars and cats. Their hearts suffer the pain of what is hidden to the naked eye. (…)
  3. They respect other people’s property, and therefore pay their debts.
  4. They are not devious, and they fear lies as they fear fire. They don’t tell lies even in the most trivial matters. To lie to someone is to insult them, and the liar is diminished in the eyes of the person he lies to. Civilized people don’t put on airs; they behave in the street as they would at home, they don’t show off to impress their juniors. (…)
  5. They don’t run themselves down in order to provoke the sympathy of others. They don’t play on other people’s heartstrings to be sighed over and cosseted … that sort of thing is just cheap striving for effects, it’s vulgar, old hat and false. (…)
  6. They are not vain. They don’t waste time with the fake jewellery of hobnobbing with celebrities, being permitted to shake the hand of a drunken [judicial orator], the exaggerated bonhomie of the first person they meet at the Salon, being the life and soul of the bar … They regard praises like ‘I am a representative of the Press!!’ — the sort of thing one only hears from [very minor journalists] — as absurd. If they have done a brass farthing’s work they don’t pass it off as if it were 100 roubles’ by swanking about with their portfolios, and they don’t boast of being able to gain admission to places other people aren’t allowed in (…) True talent always sits in the shade, mingles with the crowd, avoids the limelight … As Krylov said, the empty barrel makes more noise than the full one. (…)
  7. If they do possess talent, they value it … They take pride in it … they know they have a responsibility to exert a civilizing influence on [others] rather than aimlessly hanging out with them. And they are fastidious in their habits. (…)
  8. They work at developing their aesthetic sensibility … Civilized people don’t simply obey their baser instincts … they require mens sana in corpore sano.

And so on. That’s what civilized people are like … Reading Pickwick and learning a speech from Faust by heart is not enough if your aim is to become a truly civilized person and not to sink below the level of your surroundings.’

[From a letter to Nikolay Chekhov, March 1886]
~ Anton Chekhov, A Life in Letters

— 1 year ago with 229 notes
#Anton Chekhov  #Lit  #Cicilisation  #Philosophy  #Education 
"To cheat oneself out of love is the most terrible deception; it is an eternal loss for which there is no reparation, either in time or in eternity."
Søren Kierkegaard
— 1 year ago with 90 notes
#Søren Kierkegaard  #Lit  #Quotes  #Philosophy  #Love 
"The educated differ from the uneducated as much as the living from the dead."
Aristotle
— 1 year ago with 44 notes
#Quotes  #Aristotle  #Philosophy  #Education 
"All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reason, passion, and desire."
 Aristotle
— 2 years ago with 61 notes
#quotes  #philosophy  #desire  #passion