Showing posts tagged recipes.
x
I am a writer. I create innovative creative and business writing courses. I inspire others to tell their stories. My company's name is Writers Write. My email address is amanda@writerswrite.co.za

Hunger Games Sugar Cookies
Ingredients
1 cup butter, softened
1 cup sugar
3 cups flour
1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 large egg
Instructions
Cream the butter and sugar together until fluffy.
Add vanilla extract and egg and mix thoroughly.
Mix the flour, baking powder, and salt together. Add to butter mixture slowly.
Lightly flour a piece of parchment paper and roll the dough out. Dip the cookie cutter in flour to keep it from sticking and cut your cookies, using the leftover dough to roll again.
Press names or messages into cookies.
Bake for 10-12 minutes at 350 degrees until done.
Cool on rack and enjoy!

Hunger Games Sugar Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 large egg

Instructions

  1. Cream the butter and sugar together until fluffy.
  2. Add vanilla extract and egg and mix thoroughly.
  3. Mix the flour, baking powder, and salt together. Add to butter mixture slowly.
  4. Lightly flour a piece of parchment paper and roll the dough out. Dip the cookie cutter in flour to keep it from sticking and cut your cookies, using the leftover dough to roll again.
  5. Press names or messages into cookies.
  6. Bake for 10-12 minutes at 350 degrees until done.
  7. Cool on rack and enjoy!
— 1 year ago with 38 notes
#recipes  #cookies  #the hunger games 
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Turkey Recipes

via Lists of Note

During his lifetime, the great F. Scott Fitzgerald filled numerous notebooks with ideas, letters, jokes and essays. My favourite of these items, and the most amusing by quite a margin, is the following — a brilliant list of 13 ways to use leftover turkey.
(Source: The Crack-Up; Image: F. Scott Fitzgerald, via.)
TURKEY REMAINS AND HOW TO INTER THEM WITH NUMEROUS SCARCE RECIPESAt this post holiday season, the refrigerators of the nation are overstuffed with large masses of turkey, the sight of which is calculated to give an adult an attack of dizziness. It seems, therefore, an appropriate time to give the owners the benefit of my experience as an old gourmet, in using this surplus material. Some of the recipes have been in my family for generations. (This usually occurs when rigor mortis sets in.) They were collected over years, from old cook books, yellowed diaries of the Pilgrim Fathers, mail order catalogues, golf-bags and trash cans. Not one but has been tried and proven—there are headstones all over America to testify to the fact.Very well then. Here goes:1. Turkey Cocktail: To one large turkey add one gallon of vermouth and a demijohn of angostura bitters. Shake.2. Turkey à la Francais: Take a large ripe turkey, prepare as for basting and stuff with old watches and chains and monkey meat. Proceed as with cottage pudding.3. Turkey and Water: Take one turkey and one pan of water. Heat the latter to the boiling point and then put in the refrigerator. When it has jelled, drown the turkey in it. Eat. In preparing this recipe it is best to have a few ham sandwiches around in case things go wrong.4. Turkey Mongole: Take three butts of salami and a large turkey skeleton, from which the feathers and natural stuffing have been removed. Lay them out on the table and call up some Mongole in the neighborhood to tell you how to proceed from there.5. Turkey Mousse: Seed a large prone turkey, being careful to remove the bones, flesh, fins, gravy, etc. Blow up with a bicycle pump. Mount in becoming style and hang in the front hall.6. Stolen Turkey: Walk quickly from the market, and, if accosted, remark with a laugh that it had just flown into your arms and you hadn’t noticed it. Then drop the turkey with the white of one egg—well, anyhow, beat it.7. Turkey à la Crême: Prepare the crême a day in advance. Deluge the turkey with it and cook for six days over a blast furnace. Wrap in fly paper and serve.8. Turkey Hash: This is the delight of all connoisseurs of the holiday beast, but few understand how really to prepare it. Like a lobster, it must be plunged alive into boiling water, until it becomes bright red or purple or something, and then before the color fades, placed quickly in a washing machine and allowed to stew in its own gore as it is whirled around. Only then is it ready for hash. To hash, take a large sharp tool like a nail-file or, if none is handy, a bayonet will serve the purpose—and then get at it! Hash it well! Bind the remains with dental floss and serve.9. Feathered Turkey: To prepare this, a turkey is necessary and a one pounder cannon to compel anyone to eat it. Broil the feathers and stuff with sage-brush, old clothes, almost anything you can dig up. Then sit down and simmer. The feathers are to be eaten like artichokes (and this is not to be confused with the old Roman custom of tickling the throat.)10. Turkey à la Maryland: Take a plump turkey to a barber’s and have him shaved, or if a female bird, given a facial and a water wave. Then, before killing him, stuff with old newspapers and put him to roost. He can then be served hot or raw, usually with a thick gravy of mineral oil and rubbing alcohol. (Note: This recipe was given me by an old black mammy.)11. Turkey Remnant: This is one of the most useful recipes for, though not, “chic,” it tells what to do with the turkey after the holiday, and how to extract the most value from it. Take the remants, or, if they have been consumed, take the various plates on which the turkey or its parts have rested and stew them for two hours in milk of magnesia. Stuff with moth-balls.12. Turkey with Whiskey Sauce: This recipe is for a party of four. Obtain a gallon of whiskey, and allow it to age for several hours. Then serve, allowing one quart for each guest. The next day the turkey should be added, little by little, constantly stirring and basting.13. For Weddings or Funerals: Obtain a gross of small white boxes such as are used for bride’s cake. Cut the turkey into small squares, roast, stuff, kill, boil, bake and allow to skewer. Now we are ready to begin. Fill each box with a quantity of soup stock and pile in a handy place. As the liquid elapses, the prepared turkey is added until the guests arrive. The boxes delicately tied with white ribbons are then placed in the handbags of the ladies, or in the men’s side pockets.There I guess that’s enough turkey talk. I hope I’ll never see or hear of another until—well, until next year.
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Turkey Recipes

via Lists of Note

During his lifetime, the great F. Scott Fitzgerald filled numerous notebooks with ideas, letters, jokes and essays. My favourite of these items, and the most amusing by quite a margin, is the following — a brilliant list of 13 ways to use leftover turkey.


(Source: The Crack-Up; Image: F. Scott Fitzgerald, via.)

TURKEY REMAINS AND HOW TO INTER THEM WITH NUMEROUS SCARCE RECIPES

At this post holiday season, the refrigerators of the nation are overstuffed with large masses of turkey, the sight of which is calculated to give an adult an attack of dizziness. It seems, therefore, an appropriate time to give the owners the benefit of my experience as an old gourmet, in using this surplus material. Some of the recipes have been in my family for generations. (This usually occurs when rigor mortis sets in.) They were collected over years, from old cook books, yellowed diaries of the Pilgrim Fathers, mail order catalogues, golf-bags and trash cans. Not one but has been tried and proven—there are headstones all over America to testify to the fact.

Very well then. Here goes:

1. Turkey Cocktail: To one large turkey add one gallon of vermouth and a demijohn of angostura bitters. Shake.

2. Turkey à la Francais: Take a large ripe turkey, prepare as for basting and stuff with old watches and chains and monkey meat. Proceed as with cottage pudding.

3. Turkey and Water: Take one turkey and one pan of water. Heat the latter to the boiling point and then put in the refrigerator. When it has jelled, drown the turkey in it. Eat. In preparing this recipe it is best to have a few ham sandwiches around in case things go wrong.

4. Turkey Mongole: Take three butts of salami and a large turkey skeleton, from which the feathers and natural stuffing have been removed. Lay them out on the table and call up some Mongole in the neighborhood to tell you how to proceed from there.

5. Turkey Mousse: Seed a large prone turkey, being careful to remove the bones, flesh, fins, gravy, etc. Blow up with a bicycle pump. Mount in becoming style and hang in the front hall.

6. Stolen Turkey: Walk quickly from the market, and, if accosted, remark with a laugh that it had just flown into your arms and you hadn’t noticed it. Then drop the turkey with the white of one egg—well, anyhow, beat it.

7. Turkey à la Crême: Prepare the crême a day in advance. Deluge the turkey with it and cook for six days over a blast furnace. Wrap in fly paper and serve.

8. Turkey Hash: This is the delight of all connoisseurs of the holiday beast, but few understand how really to prepare it. Like a lobster, it must be plunged alive into boiling water, until it becomes bright red or purple or something, and then before the color fades, placed quickly in a washing machine and allowed to stew in its own gore as it is whirled around. Only then is it ready for hash. To hash, take a large sharp tool like a nail-file or, if none is handy, a bayonet will serve the purpose—and then get at it! Hash it well! Bind the remains with dental floss and serve.

9. Feathered Turkey: To prepare this, a turkey is necessary and a one pounder cannon to compel anyone to eat it. Broil the feathers and stuff with sage-brush, old clothes, almost anything you can dig up. Then sit down and simmer. The feathers are to be eaten like artichokes (and this is not to be confused with the old Roman custom of tickling the throat.)

10. Turkey à la Maryland: Take a plump turkey to a barber’s and have him shaved, or if a female bird, given a facial and a water wave. Then, before killing him, stuff with old newspapers and put him to roost. He can then be served hot or raw, usually with a thick gravy of mineral oil and rubbing alcohol. (Note: This recipe was given me by an old black mammy.)

11. Turkey Remnant: This is one of the most useful recipes for, though not, “chic,” it tells what to do with the turkey after the holiday, and how to extract the most value from it. Take the remants, or, if they have been consumed, take the various plates on which the turkey or its parts have rested and stew them for two hours in milk of magnesia. Stuff with moth-balls.

12. Turkey with Whiskey Sauce: This recipe is for a party of four. Obtain a gallon of whiskey, and allow it to age for several hours. Then serve, allowing one quart for each guest. The next day the turkey should be added, little by little, constantly stirring and basting.

13. For Weddings or Funerals: Obtain a gross of small white boxes such as are used for bride’s cake. Cut the turkey into small squares, roast, stuff, kill, boil, bake and allow to skewer. Now we are ready to begin. Fill each box with a quantity of soup stock and pile in a handy place. As the liquid elapses, the prepared turkey is added until the guests arrive. The boxes delicately tied with white ribbons are then placed in the handbags of the ladies, or in the men’s side pockets.

There I guess that’s enough turkey talk. I hope I’ll never see or hear of another until—well, until next year.
— 1 year ago with 13 notes
#f. scott fitzgerald  #lit  #lists  #vintage  #recipes 
Delicious Recipes Inspired by ‘Game of Thrones’ →

Including:

Arya’s Lemon Cakes
Tears of Lys
Bran Stark’s Pigeon Pie
Baratheon Boar Ribs with Apple
Weasel’s Oatcakes

— 2 years ago with 6 notes
#game of thrones  #lit  #recipes 
Recipes inspired by novels
From A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
Charlotte Russe
For Francie, a charlotte russe is an unattainable dessert, ogled through fancy bakery windows or served in elegant homes.
Charlotte Russe is made in a mold lined with liqueur-soaked lady-fingers and filled with Bavarian cream. According to Lyn Stallworth and Rod Kennedy, Jr., authors of The Brooklyn Cookbook, charlotte russe, “Brooklyn’s ambrosia,” was ubiquitous in Brooklyn during the early part of the twentieth century – sold from pushcarts on the corners as well as in bakeries. “To old time Brooklynites, a charlotte russe was a round of sponge cake stopped with sweetened whipped cream, chocolate sprinkles, and sometimes a maraschino cherry, surrounded by a frilled cardboard holder with a round of carboard on the bottom,” write Stallworth and Kennedy. Charlotte russe had a variety of pronunciations in Brooklyn, among them “charley roose” and “charlotte roosh.”
¼ cup kirsch (cherry brandy)2 tablespoons juice from maraschino cherries2 3-ounce packages ladyfingers3 tablespoons instant coffee powder½ cup boiling water12 ounces semisweet chocolate6 eggs, separated½ cup sugar1 teaspoon vanilla extract1 teaspoon almond extract1 ½ cups heavy creamMaraschino cherries for garnishSweetened Whipped Cream for topping
1. Combine the kirsch and cherry juice in a small bowl, then brush the flat side of the ladyfingers with the mixture. Line the side of a 9-inch springform pan with ladyfingers, brushed side facing in. Line the bottom with the remaining ladyfingers, brushed side up (overlapping them if necessary).
2. Dissolve the instant coffee in the boiling water. Set aside. Melt the chocolate in the top of a double boiler and set aside.
3. Beat the egg yolks with an electric mixer at high speed until foamy, then add the sugar gradually, beating until thick. Reduce the speed and add the vanilla and almond extracts, coffee, and melted chocolate.
4. In a large mixing bowl, beat the egg whites until they form stiff peaks. Stir 1 cup of egg whites into the chocolate mixture, then fold in the remaining whites.
5. In another bowl, whip the heavy cream until soft peaks form, and fold it into chocolate mixture.
6. Pour the mixture on top of the ladyfingers in the prepared pan. Freeze until firm, 4-6 hours. Before serving, garnish with a ring of maraschino cherries. Serve each piece with a dollop of lightly sweetened whipping cream.
Yield: 10 servings.

Recipes inspired by novels

From A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Charlotte Russe

For Francie, a charlotte russe is an unattainable dessert, ogled through fancy bakery windows or served in elegant homes.

Charlotte Russe is made in a mold lined with liqueur-soaked lady-fingers and filled with Bavarian cream. According to Lyn Stallworth and Rod Kennedy, Jr., authors of The Brooklyn Cookbook, charlotte russe, “Brooklyn’s ambrosia,” was ubiquitous in Brooklyn during the early part of the twentieth century – sold from pushcarts on the corners as well as in bakeries. “To old time Brooklynites, a charlotte russe was a round of sponge cake stopped with sweetened whipped cream, chocolate sprinkles, and sometimes a maraschino cherry, surrounded by a frilled cardboard holder with a round of carboard on the bottom,” write Stallworth and Kennedy. Charlotte russe had a variety of pronunciations in Brooklyn, among them “charley roose” and “charlotte roosh.”

¼ cup kirsch (cherry brandy)
2 tablespoons juice from maraschino cherries
2 3-ounce packages ladyfingers
3 tablespoons instant coffee powder
½ cup boiling water
12 ounces semisweet chocolate
6 eggs, separated
½ cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
1 ½ cups heavy cream
Maraschino cherries for garnish
Sweetened Whipped Cream for topping

1. Combine the kirsch and cherry juice in a small bowl, then brush the flat side of the ladyfingers with the mixture. Line the side of a 9-inch springform pan with ladyfingers, brushed side facing in. Line the bottom with the remaining ladyfingers, brushed side up (overlapping them if necessary).

2. Dissolve the instant coffee in the boiling water. Set aside. Melt the chocolate in the top of a double boiler and set aside.

3. Beat the egg yolks with an electric mixer at high speed until foamy, then add the sugar gradually, beating until thick. Reduce the speed and add the vanilla and almond extracts, coffee, and melted chocolate.

4. In a large mixing bowl, beat the egg whites until they form stiff peaks. Stir 1 cup of egg whites into the chocolate mixture, then fold in the remaining whites.

5. In another bowl, whip the heavy cream until soft peaks form, and fold it into chocolate mixture.

6. Pour the mixture on top of the ladyfingers in the prepared pan. Freeze until firm, 4-6 hours. Before serving, garnish with a ring of maraschino cherries. Serve each piece with a dollop of lightly sweetened whipping cream.

Yield: 10 servings.

— 2 years ago with 4 notes
#books  #recipes  #lit  #cake 
Jane Austen’s Jam Tartlets
Short Crust
a lb of flour
a 1/4 lb of butter
a 1/4 lb of lard, rubbed in, weeted of a moderate thickness with hot water.
Jam Tarts
Plain flour – 3/4 cup + 2 tbsp(14 oz)
Salt – ¼ tsp
Butter or margarine – 7 tbsp (3½ oz)
Margarine or lard – 7 tbsp (3½ oz)
Cold water – to mix
12 tsp. Fruit Jam
Method
1. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Add the fats. Cut into the flour with a knife then rub in with your fingertips. The mixture should resemble fine breadcrumbs.
2. Sprinkle water over the crumbs. Mix to a stiff crumbly-looking paste with a round-ended knife. Draw together with fingertips, turn out on to a lightly floured work surface. 3. Knead quickly until smooth and crack free.
4. Roll out and use as required. If not to be used immediately, transfer to a polythene bag or wrap in aluminium foil and refrigerate.
5. Roll out the pastry and cut out 12 circles with a 7.5 cm (3 inch) cutter. 
6. Line the 12 holes of a bun tin with the pastry.
7. Place a teaspoon of the jam in each pastry case. Do not overfill or the jam will boil over and make a very sticky mess.
8. Bake at 200 °C / 400 °F 6 for 15 minutes or until the pastry is golden.
9. Cool on a wire rack.

Jane Austen’s Jam Tartlets

Short Crust

a lb of flour

a 1/4 lb of butter

a 1/4 lb of lard, rubbed in, weeted of a moderate thickness with hot water.

Jam Tarts

Plain flour – 3/4 cup + 2 tbsp(14 oz)

Salt – ¼ tsp

Butter or margarine – 7 tbsp (3½ oz)

Margarine or lard – 7 tbsp (3½ oz)

Cold water – to mix

12 tsp. Fruit Jam

Method

1. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Add the fats. Cut into the flour with a knife then rub in with your fingertips. The mixture should resemble fine breadcrumbs.

2. Sprinkle water over the crumbs. Mix to a stiff crumbly-looking paste with a round-ended knife. Draw together with fingertips, turn out on to a lightly floured work surface. 3. Knead quickly until smooth and crack free.

4. Roll out and use as required. If not to be used immediately, transfer to a polythene bag or wrap in aluminium foil and refrigerate.

5. Roll out the pastry and cut out 12 circles with a 7.5 cm (3 inch) cutter. 

6. Line the 12 holes of a bun tin with the pastry.

7. Place a teaspoon of the jam in each pastry case. Do not overfill or the jam will boil over and make a very sticky mess.

8. Bake at 200 °C / 400 °F 6 for 15 minutes or until the pastry is golden.

9. Cool on a wire rack.

— 2 years ago with 19 notes
#Recipes  #Jam Tarts  #Jane Austen  #Books  #Cake  #Literary